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Rate the Last Film you Watched

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It's summer and I have a lot of preparations to do for the baby but I'll still have time to watch some movies so here it goes

Tomb Raider

An OK movie but nowhere close to the 2013 game. It basically follows the same plot but falls short of the game in every aspect. 

Alicia Vikander is a good Lara Croft but the supporting cast is meh and I could predict everything that happens in the movie. 

The bad guy is just that : bad Not fleshed out at all. He's evil cause he wants to get off the island. Period. OK.

The mercenaries with him are just canon fodder. 

Plot is simplified compared to the game and much weaker. Also there is too much Rochard Croft (Lara's father) in it. The game is better with him already dead. 

The end leaves things open for an inevitable sequel. 

All in all, a decent movie, I don't regret watching it but I'm glad I watched it at home and haven't paid 8€ to see it in the theater. Will do the same for the sequel. 

6.5/10

 

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Demon House (2018)

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The Awesome: The entire thing is actually based on true events. A popular ghost hunter heard of a very demonically haunted house and purchased it to freely investigate it. Actual incidents that occurred to families living here before the ghost hunter bought the house all have been chronicled through real news reports from small and major networks, you can you tube Fox News coverage of the demon house as the haunting really had people conflicted about the truth. I thought this was going to be just an extended version of one of the Ghost Adventures episodes but it was more than just that at it's core. You can knock Zak all you want but his enthusiasm is infectious and has always drawn me in as he really gets into the investigations and also tries to debunk things using logic and doesn't just want to sell you a haunting. Call me crazy but I always thought that crime rates were probably higher in places were past and current dark practices have been common. I will always believe negative energy will manifest dark activity in humans and animals. The interviews with the people that have lived or experienced the house were very compelling as families, upper law-enforcement, multiple child-services personnel, and many others, really help in assisting the build up to the physical investigating. The interviews are creepy as they give you an idea to what could possibly be in that house. If you allow yourself to be fully immersed and keep your skeptical side in check, you will enjoy this a lot. I really enjoyed the implication that dark spirits gravitate to areas of poverty and human suffering even if some of the most historic violent places never report paranormal activity. Diving into the paranormal and demonic unknown is just thrilling shit. Sadly, an associate and regular special investigator guest of the original TV show is murdered while the Demon House documentary is being made and that adds fuel to the story and really makes you think about just how stable these investigators are mentally. 

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The Good: Learning about the demon house for the first time was cool as I stopped watching the Ghost Adventures show and don't follow the show or Zak on Twitter so this entire story was new to me which added to the intrigue. The in-depth interviews really work well and serve to convince me that some of these people on camera have nothing to gain in sharing their accounts and in fact fall in danger of being mocked IRL by their peers. I mean if your co-worker walked in on a Monday and began telling you how his little cousin climbed a wall backwards while speaking in a different language, you would probably question their sanity. The documentary doesn't come across as manipulative or tries to force you into believing. I liked that in the end Zak locked himself up in the house and is where you finally feel a real sense of dread and fear. Credibility to the Ammon's Family story and demon possessed house tale is aided by the many witnesses involved, from police chief to the priest that performed three exorcisms on the family, it was very compelling.The Child Services Workers accounts really adds credibility to the general haunting since they were called in once the mother was being suspected of child abuse after the kids began going to school with bruises. I did appreciate that they didn't try and fake stuff and they could have done that in a lot but I think is why I appreciate Zak, he may rub people the wrong way but I have to thank him for not forcing paranormal stuff into his documentary. Yes, below I state that I wanted to see more of the investigation and less of the interviews but what if that meant they had to fabricate activity to make the documentary more "real".

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The Bad: If you are not familiar with the TV show and it's host, you might dislike Zak and his special "Yo bro-style" of paranormal investigating and might actually be turned off by him. The payoff let me down since the documentary is 90% interviews and 10% actual investigating, basically the opposite of what we see in the Ghost Adventures series. When you build up a haunted location so much because of decades of activity and with various people claiming the house negatively affected them after leaving it, you would expect so much more evidence and not just small moments of ..."what is that?" "why is he behaving that way?". The house is said to have more than 200 demons living in it and in the three years it took the documentary to be made, we only see a handful of moments that rewarded me for sitting through it. Yes, I didn't want this to come across as just a longer version of the TV show, and if you followed the TV show like I did at one point, the documentary is different enough; but the one thing that makes the TV show worth watching are all the tools and equipment they have at their disposal to debunk or confirm an actual haunting. So as i sat there processing all the information about the nastiness of the house and all it's possible threats, threats and history so crazy that a ghost hunter actually buys the house , I couldn't help but expect to see a tremendous investigation but there isn't. And while the show isn't always filled with paranormal activity, I thought the way this evil demon house was built up to be this incredible place of evil and poltergeist, just falls flat and made me think that the reason why the documentary is 90% interviews and 10% investigation was because of lack of anything being seen. I mean, three years of owning the house in an effort to capture something and while they do capture something creepy, I couldn't help but feel underwhelmed by the entire investigation. I mean, where were the tools they usually use? Surely a house filled with 200 demons would demand you bring out all your equipment and perhaps they did just that and sadly nothing was found for them to put into the documentary so they opted instead for the film to rely on the recounting of the various experiences by people that have lived in that house to count for the chills and suspense. The reenactments that plague the TV show also appear here and are less effective and actually become a distraction as what my imagination was drawing up when the social workers are talking was way more frightening than any visual shown to me.

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The Ugly: The condition Zak claims he acquired by being in the house and doing the documentary is so ridiculous to me and it almost ruined the whole thing for me. I mean, this is a house where damn exorcisms have taken place, priests have probably thrown a lot of holy water around that house but it's Zak that it decides to "attack" and affect him for the rest of his life? I know that we are told of the many ailments people that have come across that house came to experience but what Zak received was special and I can't say I had ever heard of that before. I mean, I love the paranormal and I have watched 1,000's of hours of such material and I have seen the trinity scratches be a recurring theme which seems realistic but I have a hard time accepting that no other paranormal investigator has experienced the same thing? Had they revealed at the very end that a person from the house's past actually suffered the same ailment as Zak suffers, then I would have been all in with that reveal. Instead I found myself chuckling and saying..."you unlucky bastard, you." The part where we learn that a huge movie studio is involved with the Ammons family and has offered to buy the rights to their story. While this does expose how popular the Ammons story is, it also then goes on to re-interview someone that lived with the family and claim that "for the right price, anyone will say anything." That whole sequence comes to early in the documentary and I began questioning the people that had been interviewed. Two thoughts popped into my head, 1) "Are people making stuff up because they have been paid to sensationalize the hauntings?" , 2) "Oh man, I think we are going to see some shit in that house, I can't wait!!." 

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Final Verdict...3/5...Are you a huge paranormal fan with a great and active imagination? If yes, then watch this because there is a lot of things it brings to the table and your imagination will keep you interested until they finally investigate the house. If you never watched an episode of Ghost Adventures, prepare for the reenactments and scary images as they are a staple of the TV show which I always thought was a waste since a dude in a costume isn't scarier than what my mind was conjuring. I am what you would call a "Want-to-believe" person and is why I enjoy those shows. I enjoy the notion of the paranormal and really did like watching this, mainly because despite never really, really, really being blown away by anything on any paranormal show I always convince myself that I will finally see something that will change the way even skeptics think of ghost hunting. I began watching Ghost Adventures, like most people, after I saw the brick footage on their original show. While I think Zak presents everything like a "bro", to me at least he comes across as serious about his investigating. He tries to debunk things first and not always out to prove real paranormal activity and I while I was underwhelmed by this documentary in the end, I appreciate that what we do see seems to be genuine and not manufactured even if it's not a whole lot. So the search to convince me 1,000% that someday someone will capture something more concrete that will change the course of humanity, will have to continue. 

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Edited by Con
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I recently saw "The First Purge." 

I was a bit disappointed. The plot twist wasn't well written. I had this expectation of it to be more intense and thrilling, but I should have known better since it is the pre-quel to the Purge series. You have your typical countdown, alarm sound, people scared and gathering together, and then those who wanted to Purge made their way out to the streets. These were all new actors for me, so it was a nice refresher to start a movie not being familiar with the actors/actresses, so you don't have this bias perception of their acting skills. They did manage to add in some humor throughout the movie, so that was something new.

But Dmitri.. that dark chocolate.. was sexy as fudge, so it made the movie worth while to watch. 

If out of 10 points .. I'd give it a 6.

 

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The Babadook (2014)

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The Awesome: The movie's atmosphere is tremendous. The actress playing the mother, Essie Davis, wow what a performance! I think only Toni Collette in Hereditary has this performance beat. Half way through the film I really began feeling for the mom because her acting is just stellar. I bought into her suffering and stress spiral fully!!!! The book scenes, wow, never will look at a pop-up book the same ever again. Those scenes are terrifying because of the skill in which they were shot. The art design of the book is brilliant and the fact you can own a copy of the book IRL is tremendous. The sound design is super creepy and adds character to the movie. The mental gymnastics I ended up putting my brain through at the end has been great. The line by the mother, "Why don't you go and..." was fantastic and shocking. The post-viewing research and discovery of the meaning behind Mister Babadook really transforms the film and it's ending and really gave my brain things to chew on. Did a great job of making me sympathize with the boy after finding him obnoxious the first half of the movie. The way we see the mother miss out on sleep was done brilliantly as I felt her insomnia or better the feeling that time speeds up for her when she goes to bed. That is a nightmare IRL for me as I love to sleep and being in a situation where as soon as I begin to fall into that awesome sleep state, the alarm goes off and I have to wake up, is just terrifying. The anagram: A Bad Book.

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The Good: Real good moments of dread and spooky moments that do not rely on jump scares for effectiveness. The tension of waiting for the Babadook to arrive is thick as syrup. Really liked the cinematography and set design. The house really conveys what the mother is feeling internally if that makes sense. How real the film felt thanks to the mother's performance, at times it really comes across like a documentary and not a movie. The little boy was annoying but the formula here was to get him to crawl under your skin the way he was getting under his mom's overtired and stressed out skin so you can understand her emotions. I watched this while my wife was getting ready to go out and wife kept asking questions like..."why doesn't she go see a doctor?" She does. And then she asked, "why doesn't she go to a psychiatrist?" She gets that advice too. Then she asked, "why doesn't she go to the police?", and she does, so I appreciated a character that behaved like a real life person would and took realistic steps in looking for help.  I also liked how this movie didn't follow the cliches or the usual horror stuff that makes material like this predictable, we kind of take the path to those cliches but they never materialize.

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The Bad: The little boy had moments where he smiles after he delivers serious lines and it breaks the immersion of the scenes and some moments he overacts. It's not that he is horrible, just some scenes came across as comical because of him. The ending at first really disappointed me because I couldn't figure out why things had been resolved so abruptly and if you don't get invested enough in wanting to learn more because you end up caring for the characters then you probably won't come across the theories on the movie and it's material. If you watch it because you want to see the Babadook and sleep with your lights on, just keep in mind that the scares come mostly from what you form in your head more than what you will see on screen, but you do see the monster, so don't worry.

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The Ugly: Immediately after the movie ended, I really hated the end because although I appreciate not having everything explained to me, I felt like it just ends with some sort of unexplained resolution. Had I not bothered to dig deeper and look for explanations, I would have missed out on what I feel is the meaning of the movie, which elevates the entire thing to another level of good. The CGI in some of the scenes looks cheap and the effect didn't seem to match the tone of the Babadook. The guy that wrote the Exorcist called this the "scariest movie he has ever seen.". 

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Final Verdict...3/5...or...4/5...As you can see i'm giving the film two grades, I've included the spoiler for the higher score below, so if you have never watched it and plan on it, don't spoil it for yourself so you can have the same reaction I had in case you miss it too. The movie is great in many places with its chilling atmosphere and spiral into madness. The performance by Essie Davis is worth the viewing as she really is superb and takes us on this ride. I thought I'd watch this and move on to the next but here I am digging deeper about a film four years old because I feel the writer/director showed us something normal in such a dark, dark way. I recommend it for the burn and  if you have not seen it, don't research it. I knew very little about it and I think it's best that way. 

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Spoiler:

 

The reason I am giving this movie two scores is because after learning of a theory regarding the movie, it elevates it’s genius for me. That theory is that the mother is the actual Babadook, holy shit, I never considered that after watching it. If this is the case, then what the writer/director crafted was pure genius. A scene of the mother putting the book together in a flash back would have given us too much information and would have caused me to ignore the Babadook monster threat. And I was fully focused on Mister Babadook the entire time!!

Edited by Con

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GLOW: The Story of The Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling (2012)

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The Awesome: Reconnecting with these fine ladies of wrestling from my early testosterone fueled teen years really brought back a lot of memories of not just them but what was to come in my life entering those teenage years. Just the great revived dormant memories of me coming home late at night after partying with friends and watching GLOW. Learning why the show suddenly just ended without explanation, especially since it was so popular by 1990. Learning about the lives of some of the wrestlers, what they did before the auditions, during their time at GLOW and were they ended up after the abrupt end to their popular show. Reliving my crushes on Colonel Ninotchka and finding out she wasn't even really Russian and my crush on Hollywood. I was so young when they were cancelled that I never heard that Hollywood went on to do Playboy, I do now. The interviews with the ladies were done very well and the reveals of the effects of wrestling on their bodies were sobering. A great human interest story of a group of people that put on a unique and pioneering show. The surprise in the 3rd Act was the thing I was hoping would happen as I watched the 1st and 2nd Acts, but thankfully, I did not have to wait and it was very touching and the build up was great. I love these Where Are They Now-type of documentaries. Really funny how daring and risky some of the skits and story lines were that they got away with. Seeing what the ladies look like after all these years was amazing.

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The Good: Many of the wrestlers are featured and you get such great insight to what a lot of them went through and how some tried to use the show to get acting careers started and some just wanted to be on TV, but ultimately, the ones that stayed were the ones that actually enjoyed the physicality. Finding out that the first casting calls were not for women wrestlers but for good-looking women that had no idea what they were auditioning for. Watching the show being built from the ground up and how it transformed wrestling and gave women's wrestling credibility despite the cartoonish feel to the entire show. I started watching it for the pretty girls when it premiered but ended up really enjoying the wrestling as you could tell they were being trained seriously and the wrestling wasn't great but always fun to see women pile driving each other. Without a doubt, GLOW went on to influence the women of the WWE, perfect example and serious surprise learning that Ivory of WWE fame (1999-2005) was Tina Ferrari from GLOW! My jaw dropped! Reminded me of how the ladies took what they did seriously and defended themselves when audiences implied that they should be doing more "lady-like" occupations when on as guests on mega-talk shows like Donohue and Sally Jesse Raphael. They really empowered women athletes all over the world and while the wrestling is scripted, the bumps, bruises, scratches, and injuries are real. You don't have to like pro-wrestling to enjoy this documentary as it is just a human interest story that involves 40+ people loving to entertain the crowds. Learning about how the ladies adopted their names and alter-egos and how much creative control they had over their characters and costumes. The vintage footage was great and really took me back to those years of my life. 

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The Bad: Some might find the injury to Susie Spirit a bit graphic. But her smile as she walks out of the ring sums up how amazing these women and the show was....all heart. If you hated the show GLOW, then skip this. The beat and song the ladies had to do their flows to in the GLOW rap. I know it was '86 when the show began but I was listening to music with much better beats than the one they used. Some of the girls could flow to the beat but some were cringe-worthy, but that was part of the charm. 

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The Ugly: How corporations just discard our heroes and stars no matter how much joy or inspiration they bring to us. Had it not been for social media, the GLOW ladies wouldn't have enjoyed the revival and the resulting "After-Glow Fan Cruise" and the current NETFLIX series inspired by the original GLOW concept. But try as they may, I doubt highly I can experience the same feelings I had when I watched the original.

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Final Verdict...4/5... I couldn't help but get the same feelings I got at the end credits where we see photos of the real "All American Girls Professional Ball League" players in the movie "A League of Their Own",  except I had that feeling the entire time while watching this. This documentary was just one big reunion for me with these women, I used to watch them religiously. I had forgot all about GLOW and how much I really enjoyed watching them. I was just hitting that age where girls were starting to get my attention, my hormones were starting to fire on all cylinders and here was a women wrestling show full of crotch-grabbing and suggestiveness. I was in love with Colonel Ninotchka and she still looks amazing to me. I'm glad this documentary was made as I never realized how special the show was and how these women possessed amazing drive, fight, and spirit, all things that teenage me never appreciated back then.

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Maximum Overdrive

 

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If you've not seen it you should, it's a shitty movie but fun to watch. I think this is the 1000th or so time I have seen it. It was cool when I was a kid, now it's just cuz nothing better was on to watch

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3 hours ago, JustHatched said:

Maximum Overdrive

 

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If you've not seen it you should, it's a shitty movie but fun to watch. I think this is the 1000th or so time I have seen it. It was cool when I was a kid, now it's just cuz nothing better was on to watch

Love watching that for the classic trucks and kickass soundtrack. 

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6 hours ago, JustHatched said:

Maximum Overdrive

 

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If you've not seen it you should, it's a shitty movie but fun to watch. I think this is the 1000th or so time I have seen it. It was cool when I was a kid, now it's just cuz nothing better was on to watch

10 Sentient Facts About Maximum Overdrive

BY JENNIFER M WOOD

Maximum Overdrive won’t ever go down in Hollywood’s history books as the best adaptation of a Stephen King story. But in some ways, it might be the legendary author’s most personal piece of cinematic output, due to the fact that he directed it (his sole attempt at that career). Yet King has been extremely critical of the film, which sees murder-minded machines come to life.

Though it was also overwhelmingly derided by critics, Maximum Overdrivehas developed a dedicated cult following over the years—and features one hell of a soundtrack. On the 30th anniversary of the film’s release, we’ve dug up 10 facts about the so-bad-it’s-good sci-fi/horror/comedy.

1. STEPHEN KING WAS STUCK ON HAVING BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN STAR.

Stephen King is a man who knows what he wants—and for the lead role of Bill Robinson, he wanted Bruce Springsteen. There was just one problem: Dino De Laurentiis, the film’s executive producer, did not know who The Boss was. “Stephen King wanted an ‘unknown’ actor at that time: Bruce Springsteen,” translator Roberto Croci recalled to /Film. According to Croci, King told De Laurentiis, “‘I can do 10 movies for you, Dino, but I want Bruce Springsteen.’ But Dino said, ‘Bruce who? Bruce who?’ Dino didn’t know. He didn’t know he was The Boss; the man who would change rock music. So Stephen King explain[ed] … ‘I want to direct Bruce. This is my movie and the truck driver is Bruce Springsteen.’ But Dino didn’t care. He just [said], ‘I’ll get Emilio [Estevez], Martin [Sheen’s] son.’ When that moment became official—that there was no Bruce Springsteen—Stephen King couldn’t give a sh*t about the movie. That’s my opinion.”

2. IT WAS KING WHO PERSUADED AC/DC TO CREATE THE SOUNDTRACK.

King has long professed his appreciation for AC/DC and desperately wanted to get them involved in the making of Maximum Overdrive. Legend has it that he wooed them by proving his fandom and singing “Ain’t No Fun Waiting Round to Be a Millionaire” from their 1976 album Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap in its entirety. The band agreed to provide the music for the film, which they released as 1987’s “Who Made Who.” Only the earliest pressings of the album note that it’s the official soundtrack to King’s film.

3. THE HAPPY TOYZ TRUCK IS MODELED ON THE GREEN GOBLIN.

The film’s main villain is the ironically named Happy Toyz Truck, a tractor trailer with a (homicidal) mind of its own. If the goblin-esque mask that sits on the front of the truck looks familiar, that’s because it’s modeled after Marvel’s Green Goblin.

4. THE HAPPY TOYZ GOBLIN IS A REGULAR VISITOR TO HORROR FESTIVALS.

Following the film’s completion, the truck—which was pretty damaged from the shoot—was brought to a salvage yard in Wilmington, North Carolina, where filming took place. In 1987, movie memorabilia collector Tim Shockey snatched it up, thinking it would make a fun prop for the video store he owned (at the time, he had never seen Maximum Overdrive). He then set about restoring the Goblin head and, in 2013, brought it to Cincinnati’s HorrorHound Weekend. Since then, it has regularly been spotted at horror festivals and conventions around the country. You can follow its adventures on Facebook and Twitter.

5. YOU MIGHT RECOGNIZE THE SCORE USED IN THE TRAILER.

King took a very in-your-face approach to the trailer for Maximum Overdrive, making himself the star of it. In addition to promising the audience that he would “scare the hell out of” them, King also took the opportunity to throw shade at the filmmakers who had previously adapted his works, saying that he decided to direct the film because, “If you want something done right, you ought to do it yourself” and that “I just wanted someone to do Stephen King right.” And he made all these proclamations set to the score of Tommy Lee Wallace’s equally maligned Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982). 

6. KING JUST MAY BE THE FILM’S HARSHEST CRITIC.

Despite his many promises in the trailer above, it was King himself who ended up being the film’s harshest critic. While doing press for the film in 1983, King told the Gainesville Sun that Maximum Overdrive was “a moron movie, like Splash! You check your brains at the box office and you come out 96 minutes later and pick them up again. People say, ‘How’d you like the movie,’ and you can’t say much. It’s not like The Big Chill or 2001.”

7. DRUG ADDICTION MAY HAVE PLAYED A PART IN THE FILM’S EXECUTION.

In the mid-1980s, King struggled with drug and alcohol addiction, and was later very frank with how his habitual use of cocaine, Valium, and Xanax impacted his work. He had frequent blackouts and admitted that he doesn’t really remember writing Cujo. As for Maximum Overdrive? “The problem with that film is that I was coked out of my mind all through its production, and I didn’t know what I was doing,” King said.

8. ONE OF THE MOVIE’S HOMICIDAL MACHINES SERIOUSLY INJURED THE CINEMATOGRAPHER.

On July 31, 1985, tragedy struck on the set of the film when a radio-controlled lawnmower that was being featured as one of the film’s sentient machines malfunctioned and struck a piece of wood that was being used as a camera support. Though cinematographer Armando Nannuzzi had wanted to remove the blades from the lawnmower before filming, King reportedly wanted it to be as realistic as possible. So when the out-of-control machine struck the wood, the wedge splintered and injured Nannuzzi so badly that he lost his right eye.

“That splint of wood—my god, the odds were a gazillion and one—that splint of wood then went into Armando’s eye,” recalled Martha De Laurentiis, Dino’s wife and the film’s producer. “For a cameraman to lose his eye … my god.”

Nannuzzi ended upsuing King and 17 others involved in the making of the film for $18 million, citing that they were “wanton and reckless.” The case eventually settled out of court.

9. BLUE VELVET WAS SHOOTING IN WILMINGTON AT THE SAME TIME.

While King was busy shooting Maximum Overdrive, David Lynch was also in town, filming Blue Velvet (another De Laurentiis production). Inevitably, the cast and crew of both movies started to hang out. “They were also shooting Blue Velvet at the same time, so that was all around us, too,” said Laura Harrington, who played Brett. “I remember having lunch with Laura Dern. Several times. And that was very fun, that whole crew of actors. But, of course, they were in such a different mood.”

“Because it was a small community, my night were [spent] together with people like David Lynch, Isabella Rossellini, and others,” camera assistant Silvia Giulietti added. “For me, in that moment, it was normal. Later, when I grew up, I underst[ood] that it was a very magic moment.”

10. IT WAS REFERENCED BY THE SIMPSONS.

In 1999, during its tenth season, an episode of The Simpsons in which Homer temporarily becomes a truck driver was titled “Maximum Homerdrive.” While some might just consider it a fun play on a title, it’s actually more meta than that, as Yeardley Smith, who has been voicing Lisa Simpson since 1987, starred in Maximum Overdrive. “I remember chitchatting with Yeardley Smith at some point toward the end of production,” grip Joe D'Alessandro remembered. “She was telling me about some little animated thing that she was going to be doing on this thing called The Tracey Ullman Show. It sounded odd but, you know, that turned out to be The Simpsons.”

Edited by Con
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The other day I rented "Escape Plan" off of Amazon Video starring Sylvester Stallone, Arnold Schwarzenegger, and Curtis "50 Cent" Jackson. The story line was great and the plot twist at the end came out of nowhere. I did not like some of the acting from the villain's character - didn't seem tough enough for me especially that little facial gesture and sound he made right before he died. Arnold had some great comedic scenes which I was not expecting - especially when he started speaking in German. Haha. 

I also rented "Escape Plan 2." WORST SEQUEL. Don't watch it. It drags on throughout the movie although it's pretty much the same story line. Poor acting and too much CGI. They added a new young cast of actors. The only cool thing about that movie is the new prison layout they developed. They added Bautista in there, but he had such a small insignificant role -- his name probably had a bigger role for him than the scene they put him in. I think you see Bautista in the movie like 2 times. I literally dozed off like half-way into the movie. The 1st movie is way better.. they should have just kept it there although I did read somewhere that they had plans for a part 3.

Overall, the first Escape Plan I'll rate a 7 out of 10. No vote for the sequel.

 

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@nkaujrog love your latest dual review, just one thing, in the first one you disclose that the villain dies. Could you please hide the spoilers. To do this all you need is the “spoiler and “/spoiler” brackets at the start of the sentence and at the end. This hides any spoilers. You never know who might want to watch a movie you reviewed. Thanks!  

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4 minutes ago, Con said:

@nkaujrog love your latest dual review, just one thing, in the first one you disclose that the villain dies. Could you please hide the spoilers. To do this all you need is the “spoiler and “/spoiler” brackets at the start of the sentence and at the end. This hides any spoilers. You never know who might want to watch a movie you reviewed. Thanks!  

So sorry.. I just got all into it. Haha. Thanks! :)

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Rewatched this one today... This intro with that amazing theme music just blows me away!!! 50 years after it was done, it is still one of the best Sci-Fi movies ever made!

 

“Two possibilities exist: either we are alone in the Universe or we are not. Both are equally terrifying.” Arthur C Clarke (the story writer behind this movie)

 

Edited by Spinnaker1981
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On 8/10/2018 at 3:29 PM, Con said:

10 Sentient Facts About Maximum Overdrive

BY JENNIFER M WOOD

Maximum Overdrive won’t ever go down in Hollywood’s history books as the best adaptation of a Stephen King story. But in some ways, it might be the legendary author’s most personal piece of cinematic output, due to the fact that he directed it (his sole attempt at that career). Yet King has been extremely critical of the film, which sees murder-minded machines come to life.

Though it was also overwhelmingly derided by critics, Maximum Overdrivehas developed a dedicated cult following over the years—and features one hell of a soundtrack. On the 30th anniversary of the film’s release, we’ve dug up 10 facts about the so-bad-it’s-good sci-fi/horror/comedy.

1. STEPHEN KING WAS STUCK ON HAVING BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN STAR.

Stephen King is a man who knows what he wants—and for the lead role of Bill Robinson, he wanted Bruce Springsteen. There was just one problem: Dino De Laurentiis, the film’s executive producer, did not know who The Boss was. “Stephen King wanted an ‘unknown’ actor at that time: Bruce Springsteen,” translator Roberto Croci recalled to /Film. According to Croci, King told De Laurentiis, “‘I can do 10 movies for you, Dino, but I want Bruce Springsteen.’ But Dino said, ‘Bruce who? Bruce who?’ Dino didn’t know. He didn’t know he was The Boss; the man who would change rock music. So Stephen King explain[ed] … ‘I want to direct Bruce. This is my movie and the truck driver is Bruce Springsteen.’ But Dino didn’t care. He just [said], ‘I’ll get Emilio [Estevez], Martin [Sheen’s] son.’ When that moment became official—that there was no Bruce Springsteen—Stephen King couldn’t give a sh*t about the movie. That’s my opinion.”

2. IT WAS KING WHO PERSUADED AC/DC TO CREATE THE SOUNDTRACK.

King has long professed his appreciation for AC/DC and desperately wanted to get them involved in the making of Maximum Overdrive. Legend has it that he wooed them by proving his fandom and singing “Ain’t No Fun Waiting Round to Be a Millionaire” from their 1976 album Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap in its entirety. The band agreed to provide the music for the film, which they released as 1987’s “Who Made Who.” Only the earliest pressings of the album note that it’s the official soundtrack to King’s film.

3. THE HAPPY TOYZ TRUCK IS MODELED ON THE GREEN GOBLIN.

The film’s main villain is the ironically named Happy Toyz Truck, a tractor trailer with a (homicidal) mind of its own. If the goblin-esque mask that sits on the front of the truck looks familiar, that’s because it’s modeled after Marvel’s Green Goblin.

4. THE HAPPY TOYZ GOBLIN IS A REGULAR VISITOR TO HORROR FESTIVALS.

Following the film’s completion, the truck—which was pretty damaged from the shoot—was brought to a salvage yard in Wilmington, North Carolina, where filming took place. In 1987, movie memorabilia collector Tim Shockey snatched it up, thinking it would make a fun prop for the video store he owned (at the time, he had never seen Maximum Overdrive). He then set about restoring the Goblin head and, in 2013, brought it to Cincinnati’s HorrorHound Weekend. Since then, it has regularly been spotted at horror festivals and conventions around the country. You can follow its adventures on Facebook and Twitter.

5. YOU MIGHT RECOGNIZE THE SCORE USED IN THE TRAILER.

King took a very in-your-face approach to the trailer for Maximum Overdrive, making himself the star of it. In addition to promising the audience that he would “scare the hell out of” them, King also took the opportunity to throw shade at the filmmakers who had previously adapted his works, saying that he decided to direct the film because, “If you want something done right, you ought to do it yourself” and that “I just wanted someone to do Stephen King right.” And he made all these proclamations set to the score of Tommy Lee Wallace’s equally maligned Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982). 

6. KING JUST MAY BE THE FILM’S HARSHEST CRITIC.

Despite his many promises in the trailer above, it was King himself who ended up being the film’s harshest critic. While doing press for the film in 1983, King told the Gainesville Sun that Maximum Overdrive was “a moron movie, like Splash! You check your brains at the box office and you come out 96 minutes later and pick them up again. People say, ‘How’d you like the movie,’ and you can’t say much. It’s not like The Big Chill or 2001.”

7. DRUG ADDICTION MAY HAVE PLAYED A PART IN THE FILM’S EXECUTION.

In the mid-1980s, King struggled with drug and alcohol addiction, and was later very frank with how his habitual use of cocaine, Valium, and Xanax impacted his work. He had frequent blackouts and admitted that he doesn’t really remember writing Cujo. As for Maximum Overdrive? “The problem with that film is that I was coked out of my mind all through its production, and I didn’t know what I was doing,” King said.

8. ONE OF THE MOVIE’S HOMICIDAL MACHINES SERIOUSLY INJURED THE CINEMATOGRAPHER.

On July 31, 1985, tragedy struck on the set of the film when a radio-controlled lawnmower that was being featured as one of the film’s sentient machines malfunctioned and struck a piece of wood that was being used as a camera support. Though cinematographer Armando Nannuzzi had wanted to remove the blades from the lawnmower before filming, King reportedly wanted it to be as realistic as possible. So when the out-of-control machine struck the wood, the wedge splintered and injured Nannuzzi so badly that he lost his right eye.

“That splint of wood—my god, the odds were a gazillion and one—that splint of wood then went into Armando’s eye,” recalled Martha De Laurentiis, Dino’s wife and the film’s producer. “For a cameraman to lose his eye … my god.”

Nannuzzi ended upsuing King and 17 others involved in the making of the film for $18 million, citing that they were “wanton and reckless.” The case eventually settled out of court.

9. BLUE VELVET WAS SHOOTING IN WILMINGTON AT THE SAME TIME.

While King was busy shooting Maximum Overdrive, David Lynch was also in town, filming Blue Velvet (another De Laurentiis production). Inevitably, the cast and crew of both movies started to hang out. “They were also shooting Blue Velvet at the same time, so that was all around us, too,” said Laura Harrington, who played Brett. “I remember having lunch with Laura Dern. Several times. And that was very fun, that whole crew of actors. But, of course, they were in such a different mood.”

“Because it was a small community, my night were [spent] together with people like David Lynch, Isabella Rossellini, and others,” camera assistant Silvia Giulietti added. “For me, in that moment, it was normal. Later, when I grew up, I underst[ood] that it was a very magic moment.”

10. IT WAS REFERENCED BY THE SIMPSONS.

In 1999, during its tenth season, an episode of The Simpsons in which Homer temporarily becomes a truck driver was titled “Maximum Homerdrive.” While some might just consider it a fun play on a title, it’s actually more meta than that, as Yeardley Smith, who has been voicing Lisa Simpson since 1987, starred in Maximum Overdrive. “I remember chitchatting with Yeardley Smith at some point toward the end of production,” grip Joe D'Alessandro remembered. “She was telling me about some little animated thing that she was going to be doing on this thing called The Tracey Ullman Show. It sounded odd but, you know, that turned out to be The Simpsons.”

Love this movie! Thanks for that article those are some interesting facts. 

For some reason Maximum Overdrive is linked to another favorite, Repo Man. Both have great soundtracks and star Emilio Estevez. 

A REPO MAN'S LIFE IS ALWAYS INTENSE!

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