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  1. Yesterday
  2. no_snacks

    Crew Challenge 162 - Two Times Bounty Challenge

    Still really busy here, so there's only a 50/50 chance I'll be able to get on at those times, @djw180. Will make a shout/post if I'm available. If you've already found a partner by then, I'll see if anyone else is available to join up with.
  3. Con

    No Man's Sky Screenshots

    Gorgeous! Cannot wait to contribute!! I also have decided that when I build my first base, I will be naming the Fauna on that planet after XDBX members, so yes, there will be a LimeGreenLegend, a Protocawl, "Look, there's Fidos on this planet!", etc....JustHatch will get a flying beast named after him, etc. Can't wait! I will post the pictures of the XDBX fauna too!
  4. LimeGreenLegend

    No Man's Sky Screenshots

    @Con @Fido_le_muet here it is
  5. Hello! My name is Denny Yeh. I’m a Senior Staff Combat Designer here at Sony Santa Monica Studio. Today I’d like to take you behind the scenes to talk a little bit about the development of one of our showcase boss fights in the new God of War. A warning to those who haven’t played the game yet: there will be SPOILERS for a certain boss fight to follow. If you’d prefer to experience it on your own first, kindly look away (and go buy our game)! Otherwise, scroll down to begin the journey. The God of War series has always had some spectacular opening boss fights: The Hydra, The Colossus of Rhodes, Poseidon and his water pony, among others. During these fights, the camera was usually zoomed out very far to show a sense of scale. This was because these fights all had one big thing in common: Kratos was fighting a massive foe. Get it? I said “big thing” because they’re massive. More to come, folks! We knew we needed to do something just as epic in the new God of War, so when it was decided that the opening boss fight of the game was going to be against a smaller humanoid that was only about as tall as Kratos’ shoulder, we knew we were in for a big challenge. This is the (greatly condensed) story of how we created the boss fight with “The Stranger,” aka Baldur. So, how do we make fighting a guy this small feel as big as fighting the giant bosses of previous God of War games? We do the opposite of what we always did…zoom the camera in closer! Not that close! That’s better. The close camera would help to sell the impact of each punch. These were two gods trading blows, so each hit needed to resonate with incredible force. Much of our early development time was spent on the “feel” of the fight. We wanted the player to feel like a god fighting a god, with the environment around you paying the price. We began with our animator, Fabian Johnston, doing some exploratory animations. These helped set the tone of the entire fight. It was not long before we had them running in the game, with a whole bunch of breakable objects sprinkled about. This first prototype focused on answering a few questions: How much can we push the godly reactions on both Kratos and Baldur before it starts feeling like too much? How far can we go with environmental destruction? How dense can we make the breakable trees and rocks before they start interfering with gameplay? Do these add enough to the feel of the fight to be worth pursuing? What size does the arena need to be to accommodate all of our other requirements? As you can see, things were pretty rough at this early stage. However, it was already fun to control Kratos versus Baldur and to experience all the over-the-top reactions while playing. It was especially fun trying to angle the camera to knock Baldur through trees and rocks. This early prototype helped set expectations on how the fight would feel in the end. We also discovered one big bonus to fighting a smaller character like Baldur: he was more fun to beat up. Hitting Baldur and sending him flying 50 feet was way more satisfying than hitting a giant monster’s hand. We played to this strength by making Baldur support almost all of our reaction states, such as being launched into the air or knocked back. Around this time, our concept artist Stephen Oakley did some pre-visualization artwork of potential combat sequences for the fight, inspired by the early animations Fabian did. These helped spark even more ideas. By now, we had a large bucket of cool things we wanted to try out for the fight. I created a design document next, planning out the key beats of the fight… not as exciting as Fabian’s animations or Stephen’s pretty sketches, so I won’t post it. But, I did some work too! I promise. Once we had a rough plan in place for the entire fight, we began implementing a rough skeleton for each phase, starting with the introduction when Baldur first appears at your door. As you can see above, the animation and camera went through a lot of changes, but the basic idea of “punch Kratos over the roof” stayed the same. We needed the intro to move you from the front of the house to the back. The skeleton served its purpose to communicate to the team exactly what was supposed to happen throughout the fight. This intro was later handed off to the cinematic team who did an excellent job re-animating it to be more…well, cinematic. Following the intro, the fight was broken down into three core phases. Phase 1 is the introduction, which takes place in Kratos’ backyard. During this phase, Baldur does not attack much. Since this is the first boss fight in the game, it’s important to have a phase like this to ease the player in. This gives them a chance to use Baldur as a training dummy and enjoy the spectacle of knocking him through trees and rocks (which we already established was pretty fun from our early prototype work). Story-wise, Baldur wants Kratos to attack him. He is purposely taking the hits in the hopes that Kratos can make him feel pain. Sometimes we’re lucky and the goals of both gameplay and story work together perfectly. The transition between phases gave us a chance to showcase even more godly feats. These required a lot of iteration to get right, due to the continuous single shot camera we were going for. You’d be surprised how hard it is to get two characters into the right spot during gameplay without simply moving them in a camera cut. The reason Baldur spins Kratos and throws him so high here is to mask how much we’re sliding the characters around to get in position to land on the roof. This was a recurring theme in how we designed many of our transitionary animations. Most of them have quick turns or heavy camera shaking impacts to hide the extra motion. Smoke and mirrors. You’ll also see here that we used some of Stephen’s earlier pre-visualization artwork as reference for this tree ram sequence. This fight, like many other parts of our game, is cobbled together with ideas from people all over the studio. As a designer, my job isn’t just to come up with ideas, it’s also to filter the incredible amount of creativity coming out of every department and cherry pick the ones that will fit best. The transition animations give us a change of scenery by moving the player to a new location. In a longer fight such as this, it’s important to keep everything escalating, including the environment. Another more subtle reason for moving the characters is that it refreshes all the breakable trees and rocks that were probably already destroyed in the first arena. This gives the player another new playground to destroy. This is where phase 2 takes place. The early part of the phase introduces Spartan Rage, so we keep the player in rage mode longer than normal to allow them to learn the mechanics. Baldur starts being a little more aggressive in this phase, so the player has to start paying more attention to Kratos’ defensive options once the rage mode runs out. The transition into the last phase showcases the work of our amazing breakables team. Fun fact: We originally planned to have Baldur throw a mountain at Kratos, who punches it in half. We eventually had to change it to be a bit more reasonable since Kratos is supposed to be a little rusty in this fight. If you see Kratos punching mountains in the future, however, you’ll know it was a long time coming. We had also originally planned on having Baldur attack you during this section where you’re climbing up the chasm. He would be kicking down rocks or causing avalanches, forcing you to dodge sideways to jump between ledges. This ended up being cut due to scope. However, in retrospect, it was good that we didn’t have time to include this. The whole boss fight is so fast paced that it was nice to have a few more short quiet sections like this to break up the action. Phase 3 is when Baldur finally starts unleashing all of his attacks. As the first boss fight in the game, we didn’t want Baldur to be too difficult. It was more important that he give the illusion of intensity, rather than actually being a huge threat (If you’re interested in a challenge, try out some of our late game boss fights against the Valkyrie, which I also designed. Sorry in advance!). Baldur’s attacks are instead designed to teach and encourage different defensive mechanics: Ground shockwave – Unblockable shockwave that moves straight. Sideways dodge. Punch combos – Quick punches that can be dodged with good timing, but is most easily just blocked. Block or parry. Leap into air and stomp – Unblockable in a large blast radius. Roll dodge. Zig zag kick – Breaks guard. Parry or dodge with good timing In addition to Baldur’s attacks, he needed a way to defend himself if the player was too aggressive. Since Baldur reacts to all of your attacks, he is more vulnerable to being locked in an infinite combo than most bosses. We did a lot of work to make sure he always has ways to slip out and get some of his own attacks in. Sometimes he will take an axe-hit and then counter-attack. Other times he may use the momentum of your hit to dash back and gain some space. His defensive abilities all exist to reset the playfield and force the player to engage with his offense. Baldur was also originally supposed to be able to grab your axe and use it against you. Imagine you throw your axe at him, he takes the hit, pulls it out of his body and throws it back at you. What a jerk! This proved a bit difficult to pull off… plus we didn’t want to discourage you from throwing your axe so early in the game, so in the end this feature was… axed. The development of just one boss fight involves pretty much every department. From environmental artists creating the arena, to audio designers making each punch sound chunky, to producers making sure we’re not just browsing cat videos all day. I was only able to share a small snippet here, but the end product was a culmination of everyone’s efforts. Thank you for taking the time to read all of this. I hope you enjoyed this short look behind the curtain. And I also hope you enjoy fighting Baldur! He may not be the size of a mountain, or have the ability to grow giant crab legs, but hey…he has one sick mullet. The post Santa Monica Studio details the epic creation of God of War’s unforgettable Stranger fight appeared first on PlayStation.Blog.Europe. View the full article
  6. Hello! Today I’d like to take you behind the scenes to talk a little bit about the development of one of our showcase boss fights in the new God of War. A warning to those who haven’t played the game yet: there will be SPOILERS for a certain boss fight to follow. If you’d prefer to experience it on your own first, kindly look away (and go buy our game)! Otherwise, scroll down to begin the journey. The God of War series has always had some spectacular opening boss fights: The Hydra, The Colossus of Rhodes, Poseidon and his water pony, among others. During these fights, the camera was usually zoomed out very far to show a sense of scale. This was because these fights all had one big thing in common: Kratos was fighting a massive foe. Get it? I said “big thing” because they’re massive. More to come, folks! We knew we needed to do something just as epic in the new God of War, so when it was decided that the opening boss fight of the game was going to be against a smaller humanoid that was only about as tall as Kratos’ shoulder, we knew we were in for a big challenge. This is the (greatly condensed) story of how we created the boss fight with “The Stranger,” aka Baldur. So, how do we make fighting a guy this small feel as big as fighting the giant bosses of previous God of War games? We do the opposite of what we always did: zoom the camera in closer! Not that close! That’s better. The close camera would help to sell the impact of each punch. These were two gods trading blows, so each hit needed to resonate with incredible force. Much of our early development time was spent on the “feel” of the fight. We wanted the player to feel like a god fighting a god, with the environment around you paying the price. We began with our animator, Fabian Johnston, doing some exploratory animations. These helped set the tone of the entire fight. It was not long before we had them running in the game, with a whole bunch of breakable objects sprinkled about. This first prototype focused on answering a few questions: How much can we push the godly reactions on both Kratos and Baldur before it starts feeling like too much? How far can we go with environmental destruction? How dense can we make the breakable trees and rocks before they start interfering with gameplay? Do these add enough to the feel of the fight to be worth pursuing? What size does the arena need to be to accommodate all of our other requirements? As you can see, things were pretty rough at this early stage. However, it was already fun to control Kratos versus Baldur and to experience all the over-the-top reactions while playing. It was especially fun trying to angle the camera to knock Baldur through trees and rocks. This early prototype helped set expectations on how the fight would feel in the end. We also discovered one big bonus to fighting a smaller character like Baldur: he was more fun to beat up. Hitting Baldur and sending him flying 50 feet was way more satisfying than hitting a giant monster’s hand. We played to this strength by making Baldur support almost all of our reaction states, such as being launched into the air or knocked back. Around this time, our concept artist Stephen Oakley did some pre-visualization artwork of potential combat sequences for the fight, inspired by the early animations Fabian did. These helped spark even more ideas. By now, we had a large bucket of cool things we wanted to try out for the fight. I created a design document next, planning out the key beats of the fight… not as exciting as Fabian’s animations or Stephen’s pretty sketches, so I won’t post it. But, I did some work too! I promise. Once we had a rough plan in place for the entire fight, we began implementing a rough skeleton for each phase, starting with the introduction when Baldur first appears at your door. As you can see above, the animation and camera went through a lot of changes, but the basic idea of “punch Kratos over the roof” stayed the same. We needed the intro to move you from the front of the house to the back. The skeleton served its purpose to communicate to the team exactly what was supposed to happen throughout the fight. This intro was later handed off to the cinematic team who did an excellent job re-animating it to be more… well, cinematic. Following the intro, the fight was broken down into three core phases. Phase 1 is the introduction, which takes place in Kratos’ backyard. During this phase, Baldur does not attack much. Since this is the first boss fight in the game, it’s important to have a phase like this to ease the player in. This gives them a chance to use Baldur as a training dummy and enjoy the spectacle of knocking him through trees and rocks (which we already established was pretty fun from our early prototype work). Story-wise, Baldur wants Kratos to attack him. He is purposely taking the hits in the hopes that Kratos can make him feel pain. Sometimes we’re lucky and the goals of both gameplay and story work together perfectly. The transition between phases gave us a chance to showcase even more godly feats. These required a lot of iteration to get right, due to the continuous single shot camera we were going for. You’d be surprised how hard it is to get two characters into the right spot during gameplay without simply moving them in a camera cut. The reason Baldur spins Kratos and throws him so high here is to mask how much we’re sliding the characters around to get in position to land on the roof. This was a recurring theme in how we designed many of our transitionary animations. Most of them have quick turns or heavy camera shaking impacts to hide the extra motion. Smoke and mirrors. You’ll also see here that we used some of Stephen’s earlier pre-visualization artwork as reference for this tree ram sequence. This fight, like many other parts of our game, is cobbled together with ideas from people all over the studio. As a designer, my job isn’t just to come up with ideas, it’s also to filter the incredible amount of creativity coming out of every department and cherry pick the ones that will fit best. The transition animations give us a change of scenery by moving the player to a new location. In a longer fight such as this, it’s important to keep everything escalating, including the environment. Another more subtle reason for moving the characters is that it refreshes all the breakable trees and rocks that were probably already destroyed in the first arena. This gives the player another new playground to destroy. This is where phase 2 takes place. The early part of the phase introduces Spartan Rage, so we keep the player in rage mode longer than normal to allow them to learn the mechanics. Baldur starts being a little more aggressive in this phase, so the player has to start paying more attention to Kratos’ defensive options once the rage mode runs out. The transition into the last phase showcases the work of our amazing breakables team. Fun fact: We originally planned to have Baldur throw a mountain at Kratos, who punches it in half. We eventually had to change it to be a bit more reasonable since Kratos is supposed to be a little rusty in this fight. If you see Kratos punching mountains in the future, however, you’ll know it was a long time coming. We had also originally planned on having Baldur attack you during this section where you’re climbing up the chasm. He would be kicking down rocks or causing avalanches, forcing you to dodge sideways to jump between ledges. This ended up being cut due to scope. However, in retrospect, it was good that we didn’t have time to include this. The whole boss fight is so fast-paced that it was nice to have a few more short quiet sections like this to break up the action. Phase 3 is when Baldur finally starts unleashing all of his attacks. As the first boss fight in the game, we didn’t want Baldur to be too difficult. It was more important that he give the illusion of intensity, rather than actually being a huge threat. (If you’re interested in a challenge, try out some of our late-game boss fights against the Valkyrie, which I also designed. Sorry in advance!) Baldur’s attacks are instead designed to teach and encourage different defensive mechanics: Ground shockwave – Unblockable shockwave that moves straight. Sideways dodge. Punch combos – Quick punches that can be dodged with good timing, but is most easily just blocked. Block or parry. Leap into air and stomp – Unblockable in a large blast radius. Roll dodge. Zig zag kick – Breaks guard. Parry or dodge with good timing. In addition to Baldur’s attacks, he needed a way to defend himself if the player was too aggressive. Since Baldur reacts to all of your attacks, he is more vulnerable to being locked in an infinite combo than most bosses. We did a lot of work to make sure he always has ways to slip out and get some of his own attacks in. Sometimes he will take an axe-hit and then counter-attack. Other times he may use the momentum of your hit to dash back and gain some space. His defensive abilities all exist to reset the playfield and force the player to engage with his offense. Baldur was also originally supposed to be able to grab your axe and use it against you. Imagine you throw your axe at him, he takes the hit, pulls it out of his body and throws it back at you. What a jerk! This proved a bit difficult to pull off… plus we didn’t want to discourage you from throwing your axe so early in the game, so in the end this feature was… axed. The development of just one boss fight involves pretty much every department. From environmental artists creating the arena, to audio designers making each punch sound chunky, to producers making sure we’re not just browsing cat videos all day. I was only able to share a small snippet here, but the end product was a culmination of everyone’s efforts. Thank you for taking the time to read all of this. I hope you enjoyed this short look behind the curtain. And I also hope you enjoy fighting Baldur! He may not be the size of a mountain, or have the ability to grow giant crab legs, but hey… he has one sick mullet. View the full article
  7. pete_95973

    Crew Challenge 162 - Two Times Bounty Challenge

    That’s the “challenge” aspect
  8. Hello there! Fishing Sim World is the most authentic fishing simulator we’ve ever made, and we’re so excited for it to come to PS4 on 18th September. You’ll feel the thrill of hauling in trophy-sized bass, carp, monster pike and more across some of the world’s top fishing locations. Fishing Sim World combines realistic physics systems, complex fish AI, and real-world detail for a genuine fishing adventure that’s great solo or with friends. It’s the kind of highly detailed fishing adventure you’ve been waiting for. A truly in-depth fishing sim experience You’ll have 18 different species of fish to hunt at launch, including pike, carp, and largemouth and smallmouth bass. Each species has its own unique AI and behavioral systems – from water temperature and bait choice to the dynamic weather around the environment, you’ll have to learn how they react and adapt your plan accordingly. Choose a strategy right for the conditions in front of you and you’ll land your prey. You’ll travel to seven stunning fishing destinations across Europe and North America in Fishing Sim World. Soak in the rays of sun-drenched Lake Johnson in Florida and explore picturesque Lake Boulder in upstate New York, both sprawling over 2000 acres in size. Go hunting in France’s famous Gigantica Main Lake, replicated in magnificent detail right down to the real-world hulking boss fish known as ‘Fudgies’. Or find your mark in a challenging stretch of the UK’s Grand Union Canal, home to powerful monster predator fish. Fishing Sim World is fully licensed with some of the world’s biggest brands in fishing – choose from thousands of different rig, lure, rod and reel combinations to even the odds against your prey. Grab spinning and bait caster rods and reels from Duckett Fishing and Fitzgerald Fishing. Equip them with line from Fitzgerald or Sunline with lures and baits from Nichols Lures, Missile Baits and Bill Lewis Outdoors (Rat-L-Trap). You’ll have equipment from top names like Korda, RidgeMonkey, Mainline Baits and Delkim to make your hunt a success. Find the challenge that’s right for you Whether you’re a newcomer to the sport or a fishing pro looking for a true test of your real-life angling talents, Fishing Sim World has fun and exciting challenges for you. You’ll rise from beginner to pro, improving your skills, upgrading your gear and becoming a master of the water. Cast your line from the shoreline, or get out there with one of three high-powered boats (two officially licensed from Bass Cat Boats), using sonar to find the perfect fishing spot. And it doesn’t stop there. Fishing Sim World honors the competitive spirit at the heart of the sport with heart-pounding multiplayer action. Take on friends in four-player multiplayer, and compete in live tournaments with rivals from around the world in The Dovetail Fishing League, fighting for the title of Fishing Sim World Angler of the Month. The DFL hosts multiple events across four different series, each of which has its own season leaderboards, adding up altogether to determine your position in the Global Season leaderboard. Whether you’re hunting monster pike in England, trophy bass in the States, or enjoying the peaceful quiet of a French lake, waiting for the catch of a lifetime, you’ll find something made for you in Fishing Sim World. Fishing Sim World arrives on 18 September, but you can grab your very own exclusive* in-game FSW boat, shirt, and set of rods and reels when you pre-order now. We can’t wait to see you on the open waters! The post Angle for global multiplayer glory in Fishing Sim World, out 18th September on PS4 appeared first on PlayStation.Blog.Europe. View the full article
  9. It’s the ’90s. My friend invited me to his house after school to play Spyro the Dragon on the PlayStation. That day, my relationship with the PlayStation began, as its low-poly graphics and hypnotic music glued me to the screen. Little did I know that years later, I’d be on the other side of the screen with my own game appearing on the PS4. In my surreal, retro-handheld-styled action-adventure game Anodyne, portals float through a void, glowing with the landscapes of humid marshlands, Picasso-esque green fields, and cityscapes. These places exist in the mind of the protagonist, Young, and you can visit them when Anodyne comes to the PS4 on 19th September! So how did Anodyne, a small project, get to the PS4? Just an idea On a March afternoon in 2012, I sat on the steps of my college’s library, sketching game ideas. At the time I was focused on computer science studies and internship hunting. I had made some money with small games, but I had no expectation that one day, one of those games would be on the PS4. It’s easy to view the past with nostalgia and overlook Anodyne’s long journey. That summer, I was in Manhattan, designing levels during free time from my internship. In the haze of muggy commutes and Javascript bugfixing, I understood that it was important to finish Anodyne. And that this might be my last chance to attempt something like it before graduating. Now, working alone presents challenges. While I could compose songs and design levels, I knew that trying to sell a game looking like this might present a problem. So, I searched for an artist. Racing against time Eventually, a friend introduced me to Marina Kittaka. I described Anodyne’s goals to her: It was to be surreal, like early, dream-like indie RPG games. The world would be both natural and urban, patched together with dream logic and themes of insecurity, escapism and relationships. The mechanics were influenced by classic handheld action-adventure games, but more minimal. The player only gets a broom as a weapon, as I wanted to hone in on these games’ simple and fun mechanics. Thanks to a demo and past small games, I showed I knew how to execute on my ideas. Marina and I quickly hit it off as a team after she sent me some of her pixel art work. With our graduations on the horizon, we had to work fast. In addition to art, Marina figured that without a story or characters, the game’s world might fall flat. She quickly began to write narrative elements, giving Anodyne a colorful cast of characters. Progress went fast, slowing a bit when we returned to school in the fall. It’s quite stressful to remember, but somehow, swamped by coursework and the youthful drama of college, we managed to finish Anodyne by January 2013. Phew. Porting to the PS4 Years later when showing Anodyne in Tokyo, I was introduced to Nnooo, who helped me port Anodyne to PS4. Due to Anodyne’s engine, it was an immense technical challenge to get it working on PS4, but a few years later, Nnooo’s amazing porting team engineered a brilliant solution! I feel very lucky to have met Nnooo. So, I hope you’ll get lost in, and perhaps be influenced by, Anodyne’s dream world when it hits PS4 for $9.99 on 8/18 (America) or 8/19 (Europe). Do let me know if you enjoy the game! Farewell. The post Surreal retro action-RPG Anodyne is coming to PS4 next month appeared first on PlayStation.Blog.Europe. View the full article
  10. zztop911

    Crew Challenge 162 - Two Times Bounty Challenge

    Just WAAAAAY too many restrictions for my taste. The people you're fighting will use everything available in the game.
  11. One moment from Demo Day stands out. A girl had just imitated a Blobfish swimming, to explain why her team, The Mystery Squirrels, had selected the unusual-looking creature as its protagonist for their game, Detective Blobfish. The room, which included senior leaders from PlayStation, Xbox, Nintendo and Caffeine, shared a laugh. This moment exemplifies to me not only the joy in games themselves, but the way the industry came together around Girls Make Games. When I had an idea to create a summer camp, where for three weeks, middle- and high-school aged girls could make their own games, I never dreamt of such a moment. Who could have thought that one day Executive VP of Gaming at Microsoft Phil Spencer, Executive VP of Business Affairs at Nintendo Devon Pritchard and Senior VP of Business Development at Caffeine Anna Sweet would come to PlayStation’s campus in San Mateo to celebrate girls in gaming? Moreover, that they’d join PlayStation President and CEO John Kodera, Chairman of Worldwide Studios Shawn Layden and Vice President of Product Development at Worldwide Studios Connie Booth in front of the PlayStation sign? I know it happened, because I have proof. When I started Girls Make Games four years ago, I thought of what it meant to have a home. A home is a place where you feel safe. You feel heard. You’re free to express yourself – or imitate blobfish. It’s a place where your thoughts, your ideas, your identity matters. I grew up in a place that I could never call a home. For 18 years, my family lived on a visa tied to my father’s job in the UAE. And the people in the UAE had a term for folks like us, kharji, which literally translates to “outsider.” There, in an Arabic country, I felt free inside my house and shackled on the outside. I lived in a place where expectations on me always wanted to limit me in who I was, what I could say, and what I could do. Then one day, my family got the internet, and I suddenly had a portal into the world outside. I learned that it was possible to fulfill my dreams: to go to college, to start my own business, to empower other women to do the same. Take the winning team this year, Team Sarcastic Shark Clouds. They created a game that took a multi-narrative approach to bullying, presenting the issue from both the victim’s and the bully’s perspective. They told me, “We never thought we’d win” and “We never thought our game was good enough.” Not only was it good enough to impress the industry experts, we’re going to make the full game over the next year and publish it on Steam and console. It is my hope that Girls Make Games can provide the same validation and access to education – which is the best form of empowerment – to girls everywhere. My father often says, “If you educate a girl, you educate a nation.” When I was a child, I never knew what that meant. Now, seeing so many young girls understand what they are capable of, and hearing so many leaders welcome their creativity and innovation, I’m beginning to understand what he meant. Learn about the finalists and winning ideas on the Girls Make Games website. View the full article
  12. Beez

    ps4 DiRT Rally (& the XDBX League)

    To finish first you must first finish. Wales 33:06.701
  13. Dear players, we are happy to announce that soon the world of Aelion will receive a new mode for you to enjoy. Skyforge: Battle Royale is a new spin on the popular genre that will take place inside a virtual simulation created by a god. The background story of Skyforge: Battle Royale In Aelion, humans need the aid of divine beings, you – the players. While normally you’d go out and chase Demons, Phytonids and other aliens invading the world. The Battle Royale is a virtual simulation for the mortal citizens of Aelion, where they fight for the status of becoming an Adept, an elite follower of a god. It is the new entrance exam, instituted by the gods with the help of divine technologies. The flow of the game You’ll be able to join a Battle Royale match from the start screen or from the Adventures menu, where you would usually select PVE and PVP activities. In the lobby, you’ll be able to select a class with unique abilities attached to it, select if you want to play solo or in a group with friends. At the launch of this mode, we will support duos and teams of four. Once you’ve started your match you’ll be able to select a spawn point for yourself. These spots are random each time you launch a match and will teleport you to your desired location. We had many ideas on how to make this entry phase feel as a part of our designed world and a “teleportation inside a VR simulation” seemed like the most fitting one. Landed in the virtual world, you’ll be able to collect weapons and armour with different grades quality. Hide from enemies, sneak up on them and strike the final blow. We completely reworked the aiming system compared to known experience from Skyforge. Battle Royale will give you “that FPS” feeling when playing – and less of an MMORPG. It’s really two genres combined. Additionally, we give you a bunch of objectives you can scout for during the battle. Air Drops will spawn with special loot. Mounts will help characters move quickly around the map. Special Monsters will also appear on special areas, offering a strategic place and as they will give much-desired loot. Make sure to play strategically and outsmart your enemies.Skyforge Battle Royale will be available on PlayStation 4 later this year. In the meantime, get ready for the royal experience! The post MMORPG Skyforge gets a FPS twist with Battle Royale mode, coming to PS4 later this year appeared first on PlayStation.Blog.Europe. View the full article
  14. Hello everyone, I’m excited to share with you some of the latest updates on The Quiet Man, a title I’ve been working on with the talented Human Head Studios team for quite a while now. The Quiet Man is priced at €14.99 and can be completed in a short concise amount of time – approximately 3 hours. We’ve shared very little about the game so far since our announcement at E3. In creating The Quiet Man, we wanted to take on a brand new challenge and opportunity in creating a game of high visual quality in a short compact gameplay experience that players could enjoy for a low price point. We wanted to create something unorthodox – a live action film, where you can take the role of the protagonist. In case you’ve missed it, we’ve revealed so far that… It’s a 3 hour immersive cinematic live action / third person brawler gameplay experience; jam-packed into a €14.99 game – with seamless transitions from the live action to gameplay, it’s something we feel that’s never been done before at Square Enix The events of this game take place in a single night as you take on the role of Dane You play in a soundless world where most of the game is inaudible and you must piece together clues based on each character’s actions, not words Some of our other key players are Lala the songstress, police Lieutenant Ash who seems to have a connection with Dane, a highly mysterious masked man, and gang members from SOL 33 – Peter and Marcelo With that, we’re excited to bring you a brand new trailer that shows off the intense and brutal combat, and lays out the mystery of what will transpire in that single night. One of the main points we wanted to highlight in this game is the wide variety of combat – seriously, the combinations of grapples, attacks, and combos are amazing! They are all directed by action expert – Tatsuro Koike, who is famous for being involved in properties like the Yakuza game franchise and the Power Rangers TV series. Check out just a few of the gameplay highlights here: One of the interesting things about this game is there is no HUD (heads up display). In order to show you a bit of how the combat works, we’ve developed some super simple battle guides! Using the square button will allow you to do single or combo light attacks. Triangle does heavy attacks, including kicks. Of course, combo’ing square and triangle will create different results! Circle will allow grappling and throwing enemies against the environment That’s just some of the basics, so we plan to share more of these leading up to the launch of The Quiet Man! We hope you’re getting as excited as we are. If there’s anything else you are curious to know more about, please let me know in the comments below. View the full article
  15. I’d like to share with you some of the latest updates on The Quiet Man, a title I’ve been working on with the talented Human Head Studios team for quite a while now. The Quiet Man is priced at $14.99 and can be completed in a short concise amount of time – approximately three hours. We’ve shared very little about the game so far since our announcement at E3. In creating The Quiet Man, we wanted to take on an all-new challenge and opportunity in creating a game of high visual quality in a short compact gameplay experience that players could enjoy for a low price point. We wanted to create something unorthodox – a live action film, where you can take the role of the protagonist. In case you’ve missed it, we’ve revealed so far that… It’s a three-hour immersive cinematic live-action / third-person brawler gameplay experience with seamless transitions from the live action to gameplay. It’s something we feel that’s never been done before at Square Enix. The events of this game take place in a single night as you take on the role of Dane. You play in a soundless world where most of the game is inaudible and you must piece together clues based on each character’s actions, not their words. Some of our other key players are Lala the songstress, police lieutenant Ash who seems to have a connection with Dane, a highly mysterious masked man, and gang members from SOL 33 – Peter and Marcelo. We’re excited to bring you a new trailer that shows off the intense and brutal combat, and lays out the mystery of what will transpire in that single night. One of the main points we wanted to highlight in this game is the wide variety of combat – seriously, the combinations of grapples, attacks, and combos are amazing! They are all directed by action expert Tatsuro Koike, who is famous for being involved in properties like the Yakuza game franchise and the Power Rangers TV series. Check out just a few of the gameplay highlights below. One of the interesting things about this game is there is no HUD (heads up display). In order to show you a bit of how the combat works, we’ve developed some super simple battle guides! Using the square button will allow you to do single or combo light attacks. Triangle does heavy attacks, including kicks. Of course, combo’ing square and triangle will create different results! Circle will allow grappling and throwing enemies against the environment. That’s just some of the basics, so we plan to share more of these leading up to the launch of The Quiet Man! We hope you’re getting as excited as we are. If there’s anything else you are curious to know more about, please let me know in the comments below. View the full article
  16. We are excited to reveal today that Sony Interactive Entertainment has officially sold-through more than three million PlayStation VR systems worldwide, along with 21.9 million PS VR games and experiences. We’d like to thank all our fans for the amazing support, and we’re thrilled that so many of our gamers have experienced the magic of VR and stepped into the captivating worlds that electrify our senses. To commemorate this special milestone, we are delighted to announce the launch dates of two highly anticipated PS VR games coming this fall, in a collaboration with our partners: September 25, 2018 Jump into the ring with a premier VR boxing experience from Survios that puts you in the gloves of Adonis Creed on his journey from an underground amateur to a spotlight champion. Creed: Rise to Glory hits PlayStation VR September 25. Pre-orders begin today at 8am PT. October 9, 2018 In Evasion, play as one of four unique hero classes within an elite special operations team charged with saving an embattled human colony. This intense, sci-fi first-person VR shooter from Archiact hits PlayStation VR October 9. Pre-orders begin today at 8am PT. We also want to take this opportunity to thank the developers and publishers who have brought some of the most engaging titles to the platform in North America to date. The top ten most-played games on the platform span across diverse genres, from action-RPG to horror to first-person shooter, including: The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim VR PlayStation VR Worlds Rec Room Resident Evil 7 biohazard The Playroom VR Job Simulator Until Dawn: Rush of Blood Batman: Arkham VR Farpoint Superhot VR Last but not least, be sure to check out the Totally Digital Sale at PlayStation Store, running through August 28. We are offering pre-order discounts up to 20% off on PlayStation VR titles including Bow to Blood and Torn, alongside up to 40% off (or 60% off for PS Plus members) on select digital games such as Animal Force, Pixel Gear and Smashbox Arena. For a full list of participating games, click here. Thanks again to all our amazing fans for helping us achieve this milestone! In addition to the robust catalog of nearly 340 PS VR games and experiences worldwide, there’s still plenty to look forward to, as we have a great lineup of games coming in 2018 and beyond, including Astro Bot Rescue Mission, Blood & Truth, Déraciné, Firewall Zero Hour, and more! View the full article
  17. djw180

    Crew Challenge 162 - Two Times Bounty Challenge

    I could get some time to make an attempt at this at the weekend if anyone else wants to try. It would have to be in the morning though (~09:00 - 12:00 UK time).
  18. djw180

    What Are You Reading?

    I have now! It looks great. I hadn't kept up with what has happening, last I had heard before now was when Sacha Baron Cohen pulled out.
  19. Smurf

    Anyone else here playing H1Z1?

    The frame rate is low but still playable.
  20. Smurf

    PSN Store Battlefield sale

    All BF4 DLC free at the moment. Get em while you can.
  21. Lann

    ps4 Nightlife Update

    I would pay millions for being able to bring all cars to Bennys.
  22. Squirrel

    ps4 Nightlife Update

    Come on Lady A. Something like that would have involved logic and forward planning rather than just making things up as they go. They could have added a MOC2 which was moddable. This is what they did with the Bennys cars. Actually whats happened to Bennys? Has the recession hit his business hard? Does he need to branch out to weaponised vehicles. A Bennys Futo would be a great option.
  23. The_Lady_A

    ps4 Nightlife Update

    That is such a wasted opportunity, which along with there being no option of using the new custom sales vehicles and the fact there are now two MOCs have meant rather than simplify the businesses the update has further complicated it. There didn't need to be another big vehicle to act as a cash gate. They could have just added a Paige terminal to the MOC/Avenger and charged us 3mil for it. And letting us buy supplies from that terminal would lead to more sale missions, which means more juicy targets for the assholes to attack so even more competition in freeroam lobbies to drive sales of expensive weaponised vehicles. Such a waste. 😫
  24. Last week
  25. The_Lady_A

    ps4 No Man's Sky

    That's the tutorial you're holding out on 😛 Seriously, take the leap and unlock all of the basics. You're hamstrung in terms of making money, gaining reputation and upgrading your stuff until you do.
  26. Con

    ps4 No Man's Sky

    Questlines as in missions? Yeah I have not done any of the questlines because I didn't feel ready for outer space or other worlds as I'm very poor and hate being teased with cool stuff I can't buy. Right now the only pending questlines are head to a distress beacon and I believe a space station, gonna have to fly to them eventually. Wish me luck!!
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