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  1. Chloe Frazer and Nadine Ross take centerstage in a new adventure filled with dizzying vistas and dangerous adversaries. Uncharted: The Lost Legacy launches Tuesday on PS4. Developed by the world-renowned team at Naughty Dog, Uncharted: The Lost Legacy is a standalone story that follows Chloe across India’s Western Ghats region. Her goal: to recover an ancient artifact and keep it away from a vicious warmonger. Expect plenty of heart-pounding exploration and gunplay in The Lost Legacy, including some of the most expansive spaces in Uncharted history. For a full list of new games coming to PlayStation, read on. And enjoy The Drop! The cult hit sci-fi adventure featuring award-winning platform-shooter gameplay, with all expansions and special features included! A$AP Ferg – Still Striving Various Artists – Marvel The Defenders Soundtrack Grizzly Bear – Painted Ruins The Mummy (2017) All Eyez On Me (plus Bonus Features) Great American Eclipse – August 21 at 9/8c (Science Channel) 30 for 30: What Carter Lost – August 24 at 9:30/8:30c (ESPN) Game of Thrones – August 27 at 9/8c (HBO) The information above is subject to change without notice. View the full article
  2. Hey there, PlayStation fans! This is Adam Volker from Flight School Studio, and I’m happy to let you know that we are bringing our first title to PlayStation VR next month. Manifest 99 is a story-driven, interactive narrative VR experience set in the afterlife and you’ll be able to explore its dark and beautiful world on September 12, 2017. Our team has created a rich, immersive world with Manifest 99 and we are excited to have y’all play it on PS VR. It’s been a journey creating an experience that straddles the line between dream and nightmare. We hope you’ll join us on our winding train trek through the great beyond. What is Manifest 99? Manifest 99 | PlayStation.com Manifest 99 is an ominous, eerie story about finding redemption in the afterlife. Set on a mysterious train inhabited by a murder of crows, you assist four travel companions on a journey to their final destination. You play Manifest 99 without a controller: gaze into the eyes of crows to move to their perch, viewing the world from their scale and perspective. In addition to the murder of crows, you can also use your gaze to connect with your fellow passengers. The weary ghosts of a bear, doe, owl and crow ride the train with you as well. As you lock eyes with each character, you’ll discover more about their personal journey and what brought them to the train. Each passenger represents a chapter of the experience and while aboard, you must uncover why they – and you – are on the train. The first travel companion you meet, the Bear, is forlorn and reserved. He avoids your eyes at first, but after some effort you’ll make a connection and learn of his life as a soldier, enlisted in a conflict that ruined many villages. He left a lot behind and is eager to get back to his loved ones. Interacting with each of these spirits is the heart of the story in Manifest 99. We hope you enjoy the journey through Manifest 99. All of us at Flight School Studio loved the challenge of creating our first PlayStation VR experience and cannot wait to share it with others. Don’t forget to check out Manifest 99 on September 12, 2017 when it debuts on the PlayStation Store. If you have any questions or comments, leave ‘em below – we’d love to chat more! View the full article
  3. With Uncharted: The Lost Legacy out Tuesday on PS4, we’ve curated a collection of wallpapers optimized for your desktop (oooh, 4K!), tablet, or phone. Click the corresponding link under each image to download the full-resolution image. If you haven’t pre-ordered The Lost Legacy yet, you still have a few days to do so and snag a download of Jak and Daxter: The Precursor Legacy for PS4! So adorn your devices with a new wallpaper or two, watch the launch trailer above, and don’t miss Naughty Dog’s latest adventure when it launches next week. Enjoy! With Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile Without Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile With Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile Without Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile With Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile Without Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile With Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile Without Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile With Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile Without Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile With Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile Without Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile The post Celebrate next week’s Uncharted: The Lost Legacy release with new trailer and downloadable wallpapers appeared first on PlayStation.Blog.Europe. View the full article
  4. With Uncharted: The Lost Legacy out Tuesday on PS4, we’ve curated a collection of wallpapers optimized for your desktop (oooh, 4K!), tablet, or phone. Click the corresponding link under each image to download the full-resolution image. If you haven’t pre-ordered The Lost Legacy yet, you still have a few days to do so and snag a download of Jak and Daxter: The Precursor Legacy for PS4! So adorn your devices with a new wallpaper or two, watch the launch trailer above, and don’t miss Naughty Dog’s latest adventure when it launches next week. Enjoy! With Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile Without Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile With Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile Without Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile With Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile Without Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile With Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile Without Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile With Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile Without Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile With Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile Without Logo Desktop Tablet Mobile View the full article
  5. I’m really excited to announce that we have developed an all-new mode called Archmage Mode for Mages of Mystralia in anticipation of our launch on 22nd August! It’s designed for hardcore gamers (The type of person who might be reading PlayStation.Blog!) to make sure that you’re challenged throughout the campaign. In general, one of the hardest aspects of game design is nailing the difficulty curve. Ideally, you always want the game to be challenging but not too difficult. At the beginning, the game should be easy enough while the player develops the skills that are unique to the game. Over time, as the player has mastered those skills, the game should test them more and more. If the game is too difficult, it produces anxiety and frustration. Too easy, and the game is boring. Jesse Schell has a great diagram of this concept in his book The Art of Game Design: The reason why this poses such a challenge for game designers is that it’s really difficult to put ourselves in a position of a new player who hasn’t yet mastered the skills. All of us at Borealys Games have played through Mages of Mystralia so many times that we could probably beat it blindfolded by now! A good way to test the difficulty is through testers. We’ve brought in dozens of testers (not to mention the hundreds of Kickstarter backers!) through the years and started to notice that we actually had two different categories of players – those who just wanted to play around with the spellcrafting system and enjoy the story, and those who really wanted to prove their mastery by facing a much harder challenge. Archmage Mode was designed for that latter group. When we set about designing a specific mode for players who wanted a deeper challenge, we didn’t want to be lazy about it. It would have been easy to add more enemies, increase the damage they deal, and increase their HP. That would have slowed down some players — and maybe caused them to die more frequently than they otherwise would have, but it would be more grind than fun. It would be like making runners at a track meet sprint through molasses. About a year ago, the YouTuber Dunkey (of whom we’re all big fans) made a great video criticising poorly designed difficulty levels. We wanted to avoid that. In essence, we wanted to make it almost an entirely different game experience for a very different audience. So what’s new in Archmage Mode? First, we’ve added four new enemy types – one for each element – that are only found in this mode. These enemies not only deal more damage than typical enemies, they approach the player differently. They can add elemental effects to their attacks, and they anticipate your actions better. In addition, there are optional puzzles sprinkled throughout the game, many of which have been ramped up in terms of complexity. Broadly speaking, there are two categories of puzzles in the game. The first one is door puzzles. In this puzzle type, you encounter a magical seal that you need to unlock by rearranging the different nodes so that they all connect to each other. Another category of puzzle is one that tests your spellcrafting skills, as you need to design a spell to achieve a specific goal. As a relatively simple example, you may need to create a spell that will light three braziers simultaneously. In Archmage Mode, many of these puzzles are far more complex and will require players to use advanced techniques like nesting spells. When we did our playtesting, most players self-selected into which mode they were more interested in trying. You should know that there’s no “best” way to play. Games should be fun, and if you feel like you want to experience a charming story and play around with spellcrafting, regular mode is for you. But if you really want the game to test your skills, we think Archmage Mode will be like mana from heaven. (See what I did there?) We’re looking forward to hearing what everyone thinks when Mages of Mystralia launches on 22nd August! The post Check out Mages of Mystralia’s rock-hard Archmage mode, ahead of PS4 launch next week appeared first on PlayStation.Blog.Europe. View the full article
  6. I’m really excited to announce that we have developed an all-new mode called Archmage Mode for Mages of Mystralia in anticipation of our launch on August 22! It’s designed for hardcore gamers (The type of person who might be reading PlayStation.Blog!) to make sure that you’re challenged throughout the campaign. In general, one of the hardest aspects of game design is nailing the difficulty curve. Ideally, you always want the game to be challenging but not too difficult. At the beginning, the game should be easy enough while the player develops the skills that are unique to the game. Over time, as the player has mastered those skills, the game should test them more and more. If the game is too difficult, it produces anxiety and frustration. Too easy, and the game is boring. Jesse Schell has a great diagram of this concept in his book The Art of Game Design: The reason why this poses such a challenge for game designers is that it’s really difficult to put ourselves in a position of a new player who hasn’t yet mastered the skills. All of us at Borealys Games have played through Mages of Mystralia so many times that we could probably beat it blindfolded by now! A good way to test the difficulty is through testers. We’ve brought in dozens of testers (Not to mention the hundreds of Kickstarter backers!) through the years and started to notice that we actually had two different categories of players — those who just wanted to play around with the spellcrafting system and enjoy the story, and those who really wanted to prove their mastery by facing a much harder challenge. Archmage Mode was designed for that latter group. When we set about designing a specific mode for players who wanted a deeper challenge, we didn’t want to be lazy about it. It would have been easy to add more enemies, increase the damage they deal, and increase their HP. That would have slowed down some players — and maybe caused them to die more frequently than they otherwise would have, but it would be more grind than fun. It would be like making runners at a track meet sprint through molasses. About a year ago, the YouTuber Dunkey (of whom we’re all big fans) made a great video criticizing poorly designed difficulty levels. We wanted to avoid that. In essence, we wanted to make it almost an entirely different game experience for a very different audience. So what’s new in Archmage Mode? First, we’ve added four new enemy types — one for each element — that are only found in this mode. These enemies not only deal more damage than typical enemies, they approach the player differently. They can add elemental effects to their attacks, and they anticipate your actions better. In addition, there are optional puzzles sprinkled throughout the game, many of which have been ramped up in terms of complexity. Broadly speaking, there are two categories of puzzles in the game. The first one is door puzzles. In this puzzle type, you encounter a magical seal that you need to unlock by rearranging the different nodes so that they all connect to each other. Another category of puzzle is one that tests your spellcrafting skills, as you need to design a spell to achieve a specific goal. As a relatively simple example, you may need to create a spell that will light three braziers simultaneously. In Archmage Mode, many of these puzzles are far more complex and will require players to use advanced techniques like nesting spells. When we did our playtesting, most players self-selected into which mode they were more interested in trying. You should know that there’s no “best” way to play. Games should be fun, and if you feel like you want to experience a charming story and play around with spellcrafting, regular mode is for you. But if you really want the game to test your skills, we think Archmage Mode will be like mana from heaven. (See what I did there?) We’re looking forward to hearing what everyone thinks when Mages of Mystralia launches on August 22! View the full article
  7. Happy Friday, people! We hope the week’s been treating you well. Those who’ve passed this way the last few days may have spotted the Games Under €20 promotion that launched on PlayStation Store this Wednesday. A formidable line-up of over a hundred excellent PS4 titles priced at a heck of a lot less than you’d normally expect, it contains among it some of the best re-masters of the generation. So much so in fact, that it made us a little nostalgic. So here it is: a rundown of 12 fully-upgraded classics you can pick up this weekend for a totally-downgraded price. 1. Resident Evil: Deluxe Origins Bundle In the twenty years since Resident Evil first appeared on PlayStation what we expect from a video game has changed a lot. Despite that, this 2002 remake of the debut title still holds up remarkably well. Now running at full HD with upgraded character models and effects, this is, without a doubt, the best way to experience the mega-franchise’s humble beginnings. Not only that, Resident Evil: Deluxe Origins Bundle comes packaged with the lesser-known and somewhat experimental spin-off, Resident Evil 0. A lower budget outing that still sports some of the series’ very best level design and pre-rendered artwork. Buy Resident Evil: Deluxe Origins Bundle now, discounted on PlayStation Store. 2. Dead Rising: Triple Bundle Pack Back in 2006, Dead Rising delivered what, for many, had long been envisioned as the dream zombie game: a wide-open sandbox environment where absolutely anything could serve as a weapon. Set in an overrun shopping centre, the seemingly endless ways of dispatching the undead, from hockey sticks and bowling balls to frying pans, custard pies and even a ride-on lawnmower, made the game an instant classic of pure gameplay hilarity. The 2016 remaster comes with a range of visual upgrades including full-HD resolution and increased performance. Containing Dead Rising 1, 2 and the ‘Off The Record’ expansion, the Triple Pack Bundle is your hot ticket to the series’ most memorable zombie-killing moments. Buy Dead Rising: Triple Bundle Pack now, discounted on PlayStation Store. 3. Sleeping Dogs: Definitive Edition After decades of Mafia and Yakuza-themed games, 2012’s Sleeping Dogs finally gave a starring role to the China’s long-neglected criminal underworld. Playing as under-cover cop Wei Shin, you explore an open-world recreation of Hong Kong as you work to infiltrate the infamous Sun On Yee Triad. It’s a lavish mix of brutal combat, illegal street racing and death-defying parkour. Fully-remastered for PS4, not only does it run and play better than ever, it also comes with a whopping 24 additional DLC expansions. Buy Sleeping Dogs: Definitive Edition now, discounted on PlayStation Store. 4. Dark Souls II: Scholar of the First Sin The second outing in the infamous Dark Souls series was probably the most contentious among fans. Making departures with its precursor’s uncompromising design philosophy, Dark Souls II carved out a path that, taken on its own merits, still delivers a bold and unique RPG experience. PS4’s Scholar of the First Edition acknowledged some criticisms the game received at launch as well as delivering improved visuals and performance right across the board. Packaged with all three critically-acclaimed expansions packs, if you skipped Dark Souls II the first time around, you’d be mad to miss this. Buy Darks Souls II: Scholar of the First Sin now, discounted on PlayStation Store. 5. Bioshock: The Collection The brainchild of industry legend Ken Levine, Irrational Games’s Bioshock trilogy set a new high-watermark for aesthetics, design and environmental storytelling over the course of the last console generation. Combining early twentieth century art deco imagery with dark, high-concept science fiction themes, the team delivered one of the generation’s most iconic game worlds. If you were unlucky enough to miss out on the originals, this remastered trilogy is a great way to finally experience this unique series. Buy Bioshock: The Collection now, discounted on PlayStation Store. 6. Borderlands: The Handsome Collection One of the early pioneers of the ‘shoot n’ loot’ genre, Borderlands, 2K’s stylised, neo-western take on the classic co-op shooter, was a hit with both fans and critics alike during its 2009 debut. The 2012 follow up, Borderlands 2 and subsequent spin-off Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel added to that proven formula with even more outrageous characters, vast interconnected worlds and an ever-expanding supply of procedurally-generated weapons. Both made the leap to PS4 in 2015 as part of The Handsome Collection, boasting performance enhancements, increased resolution and a vault-load of DLC to sink your teeth into. Buy Borderlands: The Handsome Collection now, discounted on PlayStation Store. 7. Darksiders: Fury’s Collection – War and Death Earlier this year, THQ Nordic announced that the third instalment in their Darksider’s franchise was in development for PlayStation 4 – a continuation of their ongoing apocalyptic saga inspired by Christian mythology’s Four Horseman. Not up to date with said saga? Fear not, to mark the announcement, the publishers released Darksiders: Fury’s Collection, which brings together both previous games, originally released for PS3, fully upgraded for the latest generation with a range of visual goodies. Buy Darksiders: Fury’s Collection – War and Death now, discounted on PlayStation Store. 8. Metro Redux Based on the novel of the same name, Metro 2033 was a breakout hit on PlayStation 3 when it launched back in 2010, spawning an equally tense and skin-crawling sequel Metro: Last Light which launched in the years following. Noted for its incredible visuals, unique settings and utterly suffocating sense of tension, the series quickly established itself as a cult and critical darling. With increased visuals and a hefty performance boost the series is now available on PS4, looking better than ever. Buy Metro: Redux now, discounted on PlayStation Store. 9. Valkyria Chronicles Remastered A true gem of the last generation, Valkyria Chronicles combined stylized, painterly visuals with a highly unique combat system and a surprisingly deep and character-rich story. The outcome was a complete left-field hit that garnered high levels of critical praise and a string of gaming awards and nominations. 2016’s remaster recreates all that original magic with higher frames rates, increased visual effects and a boost in resolution. Buy Valkyria Chronicles Remastered now, discounted on PlayStation Store. 10. Batman: Return to Arkham If you were lucky enough to play Batman: Arkham Knight back in 2015, but somehow missed its critically-acclaimed forerunners Batman: Arkham Asylum and Batman: Arkham City, then I’ve some good news for you. Both games arrived on PlayStation 4 last year, not just remastered, but fully rebuilt, from the ground-up, for the latest console generation. Sporting a huge visual overhaul that ramps up almost every aspect of presentation, you can marvel at all those velvety visuals while you bring yourself up to speed on two games worth of back story. Buy Batman: Return to Arkham now, discounted on PlayStation Store. 11. Dishonored: Definitive Edition If you’ve been eyeing last year’s Dishonored 2 with a tempted gaze, but were a bit worried about jumping in midway through the story, then might I draw your attention to Dishonored: Definitive Edition. A dark and sometimes unexpectedly comic tale of betrayal, redemption and rodent infestation, the series debut was met with huge critical applause, taking home countless game of the year awards in 2012 for its intricate level design, endless player choice and mature story telling. If this is one you did happen to miss the first time round and you’ve a particular soft-spot of supernatural stealth-action games, then this one is a no-brainer. Buy Dishonored: Definitive Edition now, discounted on PlayStation Store. 12. Back to the Future: The Game – 30th Anniversary Edition July 5th, 2015 marked exactly 30 years since the box office release of Back to the Future – a budding sci-fi comedy that would go on to become a cultural icon. To celebrate the milestone, Telltale Games released an upgraded, re-polished edition of their spin off episodic game series for the PS3, Back to the Future: The Game. Written in collaboration with original writer Bob Gale and featuring the voice talent of original cast members Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd, if you’re a fan of the films and would to see the old characters in a new adventure, you’ll struggle to find anything more authentic. Buy Back to the Future: The Game now, discounted on PlayStation Store. The post 12 big PS4 remasters that are cheaper than you thought this weekend on PlayStation Store appeared first on PlayStation.Blog.Europe. View the full article
  8. PAX West returns to Seattle September 1! If you’re making the trip, I’ve got good news — PlayStation is bringing a small mountain of playable VR and PS4 games! You’ll find them in booths 100, 103, 109, 203, and 209. On the PS VR side, standouts will include cover-based shooter Bravo Team from Supermassive Games; thriller The Inpatient from Supermassive Games; and adorable adventure Moss from Polyarc, among others. You can try out GT Sport in VR, too. PS4 headliners include Detroit: Become Human from Quantic Dream; GT Sport from Polyphony Digital; Knack 2 from SCE Japan Studio; Marvel vs Capcom: Infinite from Capcom and Marvel Entertainment; and Uncharted: The Lost Legacy from Naughty Dog. Expect to see a number of these games playable on PS4 Pro, too. But those are just some quick highlights. See below for the full list of titles, which are subject to change leading up to the event on September 1. Now for the big question: Who’s going?! PlayStation 4 Gran Turismo Sport PlayLink: Hidden Agenda PlayLink: That’s You! PlayLink: Knowledge is Power PlayLink: Frantics Uncharted: The Lost Legacy Detroit: Become Human Knack 2 Marvel vs Capcom: Infinite Swords of Ditto Ni no Kuni II: Revenant Kingdom Tooth and Tail Burly Men at Sea Dragon Ball FighterZ Samurai Shodown V Special Omen of Sorrow Windjammers Hob Battle Chasers PlayStation VR Gran Turismo Sport The Inpatient Bravo Team Kaiju Driving Range Moss Star Child League of War: VR Arena Sparc View the full article
  9. In celebration of tomorrow’s PS4 release of Zero Escape Vol. 3: Zero Time Dilemma, I thought I’d look back at the journey this series has gone through and the small part I played in helping bring it to English-speaking audiences. A lot is known about the development, but here’s a little peek into the localization side. I was working as a QA tester in the Aksys office a good number of years ago when, one day, an evaluation title came in. A little unvoiced escape the room demo playable in a browser that only showcased one room. You could click on everything in the room, and the music urged you to go faster or you’d drown. Those of us who didn’t know Japanese had to ask our translators for the solution to two briefcase puzzles because the hints relied on (slightly convoluted) knowledge of kana characters and placement which flew over our heads. That game, as many of you may recognize, was Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors (commonly known as 999) by the then Chunsoft. The office was pretty divided over the demo (it’s challenging to judge some games with a simple, quick look), but I and a few others loved it, and the push to acquire the license was successful. Months of back and forth with Kotaro Uchikoshi and Chunsoft, a couple necessary puzzle tweaks for an English-speaking audience, and it finally reached me in QA again. I bugged our editor so often with questions and fixes since it was a bit of a rush project that he likely got sick of seeing my message window flash on his screen, but I think that was how I got moved up to copy editor/proofreader. We got heavy, metal replica watches made for pre-orders and released the M-rated DS game (a rarity!) to little fanfare in November 2010. When word came from Chunsoft that Uchikoshi was writing another one, the whole office was giddy. We wanted it, no matter what. Of course, by then handheld consoles were switching to 3DS and Vita so some things had to change up. 999 was originally intended to be standalone, so we came up with the Zero Escape branding for the series. My strongest memories from working with our editor on Virtue’s Last Reward are the both of us making sure we kept all the story threads straight, a LOT of questions to Uchikoshi which led to holding onto 3rd game secrets for years, and coordinating with the voice recording studio from the office as I scrambled to write voice direction to keep up with the recording schedule. Who’s coming in for tomorrow? Dio? Okay, better make sure he has direction for several hundred lines. Wait, what was the context for this line again? Yeah, we need to change the line and reading for that. The project schedule was pretty tight. When we heard Chunsoft made an OVA for the game with Gonzo?! Oh yeah, we wanted that too. How often do you get an OVA for a game your company is localizing? We had to keep the replica watch trend going, so lighter, silicone watches were made for VLR but with a variety of colors. It was hard to anticipate the public’s reaction but it seemed like people were excited. I think it was this game, released in October 2012, that really started to pull gamers to the series because it felt like it just exploded. More and more fans were urging their friends to play, which was helped by it being on two systems, and reviews were overwhelmingly positive. We still have some of the awards up in the office entrance. 2014 was a year of on and off rumblings, but nothing concrete until the very end of the year when we got word that another game was finally in the works, by the skin of its teeth. I’d been an assistant editor for roughly a year, though the office had shuffled around enough in the years since 999 that there were only a handful of us left who had worked on the previous two games. So the project got offered to me. No pressure! I’d followed the fandom posts online and watched as the series gained more fans, and they had high expectations. It was… daunting. The localization process for Zero Time Dilemma was quite different from the other two Zero Escape games. Those were complete before they came to us, while ZTD was done concurrently. As soon as the text was finished in Japan in early 2015, it was given to us, before a majority of the animation was done. The first two were narration and dialog with user controlled text advancing, while this one was all timed dialog that advanced automatically in a cinematic fashion. It was a challenge, keeping track of the timelines and plot threads, and like always, a lot of questions sent to Uchikoshi. But I got to put my own little mark on a series I hold dear to my heart by coming up with anagrams, scanning my handwriting, and picking out English voices. I’m sure most of my coworkers would say I was consumed by ZTD for over a year. A lot of my soul went into the project; I’m kind of not fazed by much these days. Thank you to all the fans who stuck with the Zero Escape series, and those of you who joined along the way – the trilogy is finally complete! It’s been a crazy ride! Getting to work on one of my all-time favorite series was a dream come true. When The Nonary Games was greenlit, I couldn’t believe I’d get to revisit one of the earliest games worked on, and give voices to some of my favorite characters. The time in the recording studio for 999 was like a dream. And now all three games will be available on PS4! I sincerely hope more gamers get to experience the rollercoaster of a story that the Zero Escape series offers. If you’ve never played the series before, now is the perfect time to start! Join us in experiencing the joy, the sorrow, the suspense, the horror, the laughter, and the heartbreak that comes from the mind of Kotaro Uchikoshi. Zero Escape Vol. 3: Zero Time Dilemma will be available on PS4 for both physical release and digital in North America this Friday, August 18th! View the full article
  10. Greetings dear Prospects, the team here at Sloclap is super excited to present Absolver to the PlayStation community on 29th August and so wanted to dive into one of the game’s biggest feature ahead of launch – online cooperative and competitive play! The new ‘Friends & Foes’ video feature above illustrates some of the online experiences you can expect in Absolver and we wanted to provide some more insight into what it all means and how these different experiences will affect your time in the ruins of the fallen Adal Empire. Cooperative combat Absolver is designed to be a unique mix of solo adventure and online multiplayer experience in a shared world where players can choose to interact with each other in a variety of ways. When exploring the ruins of Raslan, the fallen capital of the Adal Empire, players are matchmaked together seamlessly: the city is made out of a dozen interconnected zones, and as you go from one zone to another, you will be connected with one or two other players also in that zone, without loading times. These two players may choose to spar together in an effort to share knowledge on different attacks, engage in a more aggressive fight, purposefully form a team for co-op PvE, or simply pass each other with no interaction at all… This method of online structure allows for players to both engage with random players from their region as well as intentional meetings: by meditating at an altar, you can decide to invite specific players to your world, from players you have encountered recently, to members of your friends list. Mentors and students Another feature our team is excited about is the ability to take the idea of cooperative play one step further and have players enter into a formal, in-game mentor – student relationship. This means that players, usually more advanced ones, can create a ‘Fighting School’ and allow other players to join it, effectively becoming their mentors. Fighting Schools are based on the mentor’s playstyle, with mentors defining which combat deck, weapons, and powers they will share with their students. By progressing in their mentor’s school, students will be able to use these combat decks, even if they feature attacks they haven’t learnt themselves. They will also be able to unlock the combat style of their mentor, effectively allowing them to learn and practice a variety of combat styles, and not just the original one of their character. Our hope is that this feature will foster a sense of sharing and player camaraderie amongst the Absolver community, in addition to the more aggressive, competitive angle that comes with a fighting game. Competitive modes Absolver is at its heart a complex and nuanced fighting game and nothing puts that front and center more than the raw 1v1 competitive mode. The first mode available pits two players against one another in one of several distinct versus mode arenas with three health bars each. Players will have access to the set Combat Deck, weapons, and powers during the fight and, in some settings, must also account for environmental variables like changing terrain and deadly cliffs. Our intention is to expand upon competitive features in the weeks and months after launch with the introduction of 3v3 mode, ranked matches, and a spectator mode. Hopefully this sheds a bit of light on what awaits you when Absolver launches on 29th August but rest assured we’ve not revealed all that Absolver has to offer, as part of the excitement comes from discovery as you roam the world alone or with others. Launch day isn’t far off now and we look forward to seeing you online, whether you turn out to be friend or foe! The post Explore or spar with friends, mentor students and clash with fellow fighters in PS4’s Absolver, out 29th August appeared first on PlayStation.Blog.Europe. View the full article
  11. Greetings dear Prospects, the team here at Sloclap is super excited to present Absolver to the PlayStation community on August 29, and we wanted to dive into one of the game’s biggest feature ahead of launch – online cooperative and competitive play. The new ‘Friends & Foes’ video feature in this post illustrates some of the online experiences you can expect in Absolver and we wanted to provide some more insight into what it all means and how these different experiences will affect your time in the ruins of the fallen Adal Empire. Cooperative Combat Absolver is designed to be a unique mix of solo adventure and online multiplayer experience in a shared world where players can choose to interact with each other in a variety of ways. When exploring the ruins of Raslan, the fallen capital of the Adal Empire, players are matchmaked together seamlessly: the city is made out of a dozen interconnected zones, and as you go from one zone to another, you will be connected with one or two other players also in that zone, without loading times. These two players may choose to spar together in an effort to share knowledge on different attacks, engage in a more aggressive fight, purposefully form a team for co-op PvE, or simply pass each other with no interaction at all… This method of online structure allows for players to both engage with random players from their region as well as intentional meetings: by meditating at an altar, you can decide to invite specific players to your world, from players you have encountered recently, to members of your friends list. Mentors and Students Another feature our team is excited about is the ability to take the idea of cooperative play one step further and have players enter into a formal, in-game mentor – student relationship. This means that players, usually more advanced ones, can create a ‘Fighting School’ and allow other players to join it, effectively becoming their mentors. Fighting Schools are based on the mentor’s playstyle, with mentors defining which combat deck, weapons, and powers they will share with their students. By progressing in their mentor’s school, students will be able to use these Combat Decks, even if they feature attacks they haven’t learnt themselves. They will also be able to unlock the Combat Style of their mentor, effectively allowing them to learn and practice a variety of Combat Styles, and not just the original one of their character. Our hope is that this feature will foster a sense of sharing and player camaraderie amongst the Absolver community, in addition to the more aggressive, competitive angle that comes with a fighting game. Competitive Modes Absolver is at its heart a complex and nuanced fighting game and nothing puts that front and center more than the raw 1v1 competitive mode. The first mode available pits two players against one another in one of several distinct versus mode arenas with three health bars each. Players will have access to the set Combat Deck, weapons, and powers during the fight and, in some settings, must also account for environmental variables like changing terrain and deadly cliffs. Our intention is to expand upon competitive features in the weeks and months after launch with the introduction of 3v3 mode, ranked matches, and a spectator mode. Hopefully this sheds a bit of light on what awaits you when Absolver launches on August 29, but rest assured we’ve not revealed all that Absolver has to offer, as part of the excitement comes from discovery as you roam the world alone or with others. Launch day isn’t far off now and we look forward to seeing you online, whether you turn out to be friend or foe! View the full article
  12. If you were selected to be a beta tester for the next major PlayStation 4 system software update 5.00 (codenamed NOBUNAGA), today’s the day you can get your hands on the new features. If you were chosen, you’ll receive an email with instructions on how to download the update and get started. Whether you’re in the beta programme or not, we wanted to give a first look at the features included in this update. We’re introducing Family Accounts, making it easier to manage your friends, and adding a variety of new features for broadcast, notifications, messages and much more. Families on PlayStation Network The existing master/sub-account system is being redesigned to be more family friendly. This new “family on PSN” system will offer a more flexible experience, make it easier to set up PSN accounts for children, and customize parental control settings for each family user. Below are the new features that will be introduced with update 5.00: Family Manager, parents/guardians and child accounts Each family on PSN will now have a Family Manager. In turn, the Family Manager can promote any other adult in the family to be a parent or guardian. From there, each parent or guardian can customise the parental control levels of each child account, such as restricting certain age ratings or online access. Individual parental controls Before this update, the same parental controls were applied to all users on the same console, including adults. But with 5.00, all controls (including game age ratings) can be individually controlled for each child account. Friend list management In place of the current ‘Favourite Groups’ tab, we’re adding a new ‘Custom Lists’ tab on the ‘Friends’ screen. This will allow you to create and edit custom lists of your friends and arrange them into specific groups, based on the games you play, or groups of friends you like to hang out with online. For example, you can create a custom list of your Destiny teammates and easily send them raid invites. Broadcast feature updates Communities If you’ve set up a community on your PS4, you can now link your community to your live gameplay broadcast. When a broadcast is linked to a community, the community button appears on the ‘Live from PlayStation’ spectator screen, allowing any spectator to jump directly into your community page to check out the details or join. PlayStation VR We’ve added a new setting in PlayStation VR: ‘Display Message to Spectators and Spectators’ Comments’. Once this is enabled, spectator comments sent during a broadcast are displayed not only in cinematic mode, but also in VR mode – so you’ll be able to read comments and interact with spectators from within your PS VR headset. PlayStation 4 Pro Good news for Twitch users: with this update, PS4 Pro will support 1080p 60fps streaming on Twitch. Message improvements You’ve already been able to share your favourite music to Twitter and Facebook via Spotify and PlayStation Music, but now you’ll also be able to share individual tracks by sending a message on PS4. Your friends will be able to listen to the track directly from the message you send, and if they’re on their mobile device, they can jump directly to their Spotify app from the PS Messages app to check out the song and add it to their own playlist. Notifications updates We’ve added a new setting that allows you to disable pop-up notifications while you’re watching a movie or TV show on your PS4. This setting is set to ‘off’ by default, so go to Settings > Notifications to enable it. Furthermore, you now have the option to turn off message previews on your pop-up notifications. If you turn this setting off, the pop-up notification will hide the message senders’ online ID and will display a generic user icon and message instead. Lastly, you’ll have the option to change the colour of your pop-up notifications to either white (default) or black. Quick Menu updates If you want to keep an eye out on what’s happening in your Notifications tab – like game download progress or new invitations – you can now access this directly from the Quick Menu without leaving your game. Also, we’ve added a ‘Leave Party’ option in the Quick Menu, so you can easily exit a party and go right back to playing your game. Virtual surround sound on PS VR PlayStation VR now supports 5.1ch and 7.1ch virtual surround sound through your headphones when watching Blu-rays and DVDs in Cinematic Mode, making for an even more immersive viewing experience. Improved tournaments bracket viewer We’ve added a new ‘bracket viewer’ that shows full tournament brackets for Single Elimination and Double Elimination tournaments on PS4, making it easier for you to see the current tournament standings. Updated language support The PS4 user interface now supports Czech, Hungarian, Romanian, Greek, Thai, Indonesian and Vietnamese languages. As always, if you’ve been chosen as a beta tester, your feedback is really important to use and lets us fine-tune the new additions ahead of the full system software release. We really hope you enjoy using these new features – let us know how you get on in the comments below, and through the usual feedback forums. The post PS4 system software 5.00 features detailed appeared first on PlayStation.Blog.Europe. View the full article
  13. The beta for the PlayStation 4 system’s next major system software update 5.00 (codenamed NOBUNAGA) rolls out today for those of you that were selected for the beta program. If you signed up and were chosen, you’ll receive an email with instructions on how to download and get started. Whether you’re in the beta program or not, we wanted to give a first look at the features included in this update. We’re introducing family on PSN, making it easier to manage your friends, and adding a variety of new features for Broadcast, Notifications, Messages, and much more. Family on PSN We’re overhauling the current master/sub-account system, and introducing the new “Family on PlayStation Network.” This new system will offer a more flexible experience for families on PS4 by making it easier to setup PSN accounts for children and customize parental control settings. Below are the new features that will be introduced with family on PSN: Family Manager, Parent/Guardian Family on PSN will allow multiple adults to be part of a single family. The Family Manager can promote another adult inside the family to a Parent/Guardian, who can then customize parental control levels of children’s accounts. Individualized Parental Controls Before this update, the same parental controls were applied to all users on the same console, including adults. But with 5.00, all controls (including game age ratings) can be individually attuned for each child. Friend List Management In place of the current ‘Favorite Groups’ tab, we’re adding a new ‘Custom Lists’ tab within Friends, which allows you to create and edit custom lists of your friends. This makes it easier for you to manage your friends and access specific groups. For example, you can create a custom list of your Destiny teammates and easily send them raid invites. Broadcast feature updates Communities If you own a community, you can now bind your community to your broadcast. When a broadcast is linked to a community, the community button appears on the Live from PlayStation spectator screen. Once a spectator clicks on the community button, they’ll be able to jump directly to your community page to check out the details. PlayStation VR We’ve added a new setting in PlayStation VR: Display Message to Spectators and Spectators’ Comments. Once this is enabled, spectator comments sent during a broadcast is displayed not only in cinematic mode, but also in VR mode. This makes it much easier for VR broadcasters to keep up on comments and communicate with their viewers. PlayStation 4 Pro Good news Twitch users: with this update, PS4 Pro will support 1080p 60fps streaming on Twitch. Messages Improvements You’ve already been able to share your favorite music to Twitter and Facebook via PlayStation Music, but now you’ll also be able to share via messages using your PS4. If your friends are on PS4, they can listen to the track right inside the message by booting up Quick Menu, and if they’re on their mobile device, they can jump directly to the Spotify app from the PS Messages app to check out the song. In addition, if you’re part of multiple message groups, you can now easily leave several groups at once. Just open up Options in the message list, select Leave, and choose the message groups you want to leave. Notifications Updates We’ve added a new setting that allows you to disable pop-up notifications while you’re watching a movie or TV show on your PS4. This setting is off by default, so go to Settings > Notifications to disable notifications and go uninterrupted during your videos. Furthermore, you now have the option to turn off message previews on your pop-up notifications. If you turn this setting off, the pop-up notification will hide the message senders’ online ID and will display a generic user icon and message instead. Lastly, you’ll have the option to change the color of your pop-up notifications to either white (default) or black. Quick Menu Updates If you want to keep an eye out on what’s happening under Notifications, like the progress of your game downloads/installations or new party invites, you can now access this directly from the Quick Menu so you don’t have to step away from your game every time you want to check your notifications. Also, we’ve added a ‘Leave Party’ option in the Quick Menu, so you can easily exit a party and go right back to playing your game. In addition, now you’ll see the system clock in the upper-right corner of the screen when you pop open the Quick Menu. Virtual Surround Sound on PS VR PlayStation VR now supports 5.1ch and 7.1ch virtual surround sound on your headphones when watching Blu-rays and DVDs in Cinematic Mode, making for an even more immersive viewing experience Improved Tournaments Bracket Viewer We have a new bracket viewer that shows full tournament brackets for Single Elimination and Double Elimination tournaments on PS4. This makes it easier for you to see the current tournament standings. New System Language Additions With this update, we’re adding the following system language options on PS4: Czech, Greek, Hungarian, Indonesian, Romanian, Thai and Vietnamese. View the full article
  14. Listen up Tankers, Wargaming has massive news to share. Beginning 22nd August, we’re introducing the first ever single player campaign mode in World of Tanks history. The mode is called War Stories, and believe me when I tell you, this is a tanking experience like nothing you’ve played before. In War Stories, tankers will be given the thrill of experiencing story driven, episodic gameplay (solo or co-op), enabling you to relive historical events, play-out alternative histories, and even explore the chaos of fantasy campaigns. A new tank tutorial will also make it easier for incoming players to immerse themselves into the game thanks to a thorough three-part training mission that covers basic movement, scouting, sniping and a brief overview on tank armor and performance capabilities. In “Flashpoint Berlin”, a conflict between the Allies and Soviet forces in Germany leads to armoured warfare after the Allied High Commission decides that the Soviet blockade of Berlin is in violation of the Potsdam Agreements. And with the power of PlayStation and PS4 Pro, rewriting history in World of Tanks has never looked better. And this is only the beginning, as Wargaming promises to introduce new campaigns to War Stories throughout the year, including historic, alternative history and fantasy campaigns ratcheting up the intensity like never before. The battlefield is about to change, and we can’t wait for everybody to jump inside these War Stories as Wargaming unleashes the ultimate World of Tanks experience exclusive to console. See you in battle! The post World of Tanks debuts single player campaign in War Stories, out on PS4 22nd August appeared first on PlayStation.Blog.Europe. View the full article
  15. Listen up Tankers, Wargaming has massive news to share. Beginning August 22nd, we’re introducing the first ever single player campaign mode in World of Tanks history. The mode is called War Stories, and believe me when I tell you, this is a tanking experience like nothing you’ve played before. In War Stories, tankers will be given the thrill of experiencing story-driven, episodic gameplay (solo or co-op), enabling you to relive historical events, play-out alternative histories, and even explore the chaos of fantasy campaigns. A new tank tutorial will also make it easier for incoming players to immerse themselves into the game thanks to a thorough three-part training mission that covers basic movement, scouting, sniping and a brief overview on tank armor and performance capabilities. In “Flashpoint Berlin”, a conflict between the Allies and Soviet forces in Germany leads to armored warfare after the Allied High Commission decides that the Soviet blockade of Berlin is in violation of the Potsdam Agreements. And with the power of PS4 and PS4 Pro, rewriting history in World of Tanks has never looked better. And this is only the beginning, as Wargaming promises to introduce new campaigns to War Stories throughout the year, including historic, alternative history and fantasy campaigns ratcheting up the intensity like never before. The battlefield is about to change, and we can’t wait for everybody to jump inside these War Stories as Wargaming unleashes the ultimate World of Tanks experience exclusive to console. See you in battle! View the full article

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